Feeds

Korea mounts Intel antitrust probe

'Marketing and rebate programmes' under investigation

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Next gen security for virtualised datacentres

South Korean antitrust investigators are probing Intel's dealings with local PC makers, it has emerged.

In June, Korea's Fair Trade Commission asked Intel to supply information regarding "marketing and rebate programmes" put in place by the chip giant's Korean subsidiary, Intel's latest filing with the US Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) reveal.

Intel said it was "co-operating with these agencies" and that it "expects these matters will be acceptably resolved".

The company doesn't go into details, but it's likely the programmes in question are akin to those that got it into hot water in Japan this year and which are also the foundation of a European Commission probe into the company's dealings with its customers there.

In Japan, Intel's local subsidiary was ruled to have violated Japanese antitrust law - a charge Intel denies, though it nonetheless accepted the Japanese Fair Trade Commission's request that it put an end to its marketing and rebate programmes.

On the strength of that verdict, AMD began legal proceedings against Intel in the US and Japan. In its latest SEC filing, Intel maintains that there is no direct connection between AMD's legal action and the Korean investigation.

In Europe, the investigation was recently stepped up, with a series of dawn raids mounted upon Intel offices in the UK and Germany in a bid to seek evidence for anti-competitive behaviour. The EC probe has been ongoing since 2001. ®

Related stories

NEC rejects AMD subpoena demands
AMD's battle with Intel to go west?
Date set for Intel's response to AMD antitrust claims
Japan.gov bans Intel for two months
EC officials raid Intel offices
Intel heeds Japanese antitrust probe warning
Japan calls Intel to task over anti-AMD rebates
Intel Japan faces anti-trust action

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
6 Obvious Reasons Why Facebook Will Ban This Article (Thank God)
Clampdown on clickbait ... and El Reg is OK with this
No, thank you. I will not code for the Caliphate
Some assignments, even the Bongster decline must
Kaspersky backpedals on 'done nothing wrong, nothing to fear' blather
Founder (and internet passport fan) now says privacy is precious
TROLL SLAYER Google grabs $1.3 MEEELLION in patent counter-suit
Chocolate Factory hits back at firm for suing customers
Mozilla's 'Tiles' ads debut in new Firefox nightlies
You can try turning them off and on again
Facebook, Google and Instagram 'worse than drugs' says Miley Cyrus
Italian boffins agree with popette's theory that haters are the real wrecking balls
Sit tight, fanbois. Apple's '$400' wearable release slips into early 2015
Sources: time to put in plenty of clock-watching for' iWatch
prev story

Whitepapers

Endpoint data privacy in the cloud is easier than you think
Innovations in encryption and storage resolve issues of data privacy and key requirements for companies to look for in a solution.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Advanced data protection for your virtualized environments
Find a natural fit for optimizing protection for the often resource-constrained data protection process found in virtual environments.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.