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UK to get Xbox 360 on '25 November'

'Highly-placed' mole spills beans

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Microsoft will ship its Xbox 360 console on Friday, 25 November, "highly placed" sources cited in a GamesIndustry.biz report have claimed.

According to the moles, the console could cost up to £299.

To be fair, that figure is a guess based on information said to be coming out of Microsoft rather than genuine pricing data. In the US, the 360 has been claimed by Wal-Mart employees to be $299 (£168), so something closer to £199 would seem more probable - assuming, of course, the quoted US price is right.

"The original plan was £249, but now that Sony is talking about the PS3 being expensive, £299 is looking more likely," said the site's source.

Microsoft's schedule seems more certain. The European launch date will, apparently, be announced next Monday to the trade, followed two days later by the public announcement.

Microsoft would not comment on the report. ®

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