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Intel aligns key old-style Centrino EOL dates

400MHz FSB CPUs, chipsets for the chop

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Anyone in the market for Intel's 855 and 852 mobile chipsets now has a month more to request product before the chip giant stops taking cancellable orders for them.

Prospective buyers now have until 23 September to order the 400MHz FSB, AGP 4x Centrino chipsets and still get the chance to pull out of the order. Until recently, the cut-off date was 19 August. That date was itself a revision, pulled forward from 26 August, Intel documents seen by The Register reveal.

The 23 September date is the key, here, because that's the day on which orders for the 1.6, 1.7, 1.8, 2.0 and 2.1GHz Pentium M processors, and a stack of Celeron M parts derived from them, become non-cancellable.

The full list of chipsets covered by the latest change are the 855PM, 855GM, 855GME, 852GME, 852GMV, 852PM and 852GM.

Intel will ship the last parts on 21 April 2006. It will take no more orders from 25 November 2005. The chipsets will, however, be made available to Intel customers developing embedded applications.

The move to kill off the 855 and 852 families will leave Intel's 910 and 915 Express chipsets as its key offerings for notebook computers. ®

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