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London Tube terror game sparks outrage

'Mind the Bombs' branded 'sick' and 'twisted'

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UK tabloid the Sun is beside itself with rage today after discovering an online game in which players have to stop bombs detonating on the London Underground system.

The Mind the Bombs website invites you to: "Do your part in the war against terrorism - email this FREE game to all your friends, family and associates to enjoy!", while declaring itself "dedicated to the good people of Britain - specifically those individuals directly affected by terrorist activity in London. God save the Queen".

A disclaimer - evidently added by creator Keith E. Fieler to avoid possible litigation - states: "This game is in no way affiliated with Transport for London."

Which is just as well, because the Sun, after making short work of Mind the Bombs with the obligatory "sick" and "twisted", quotes a spokesman for London Transport as saying: "Passengers on the Underground and their staff were faced with horrific scenes on July 7. Anybody involved in the making or viewing of this game would do well to stop and think about that. We will never forget those who were killed and injured in the attacks."

And a representative of London Transport Users Committee raged: "Londoners are just getting on with it and we think people should show this game the contempt it deserves. I don't think anybody will find it very funny or very pleasant."

We're inclined to agree, although the Sun in its apoplectic state has missed a fundamental point - Mind the Bombs is complete and utter crap. In fact, the only interesting thing about the whole exercise is that a tempting "More Games" link on the site leads straight to listings for online casinos. Naughty, naughty, Mr Fieler - we wouldn't like to think you are trying to squeeze some cash out of this contribution to the war against terrorism. ®

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