Feeds

Cisco details Black Hat vuln fix

Side issue

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

SANS - Survey on application security programs

Cisco last week urged users of its networking kit to upgrade their software following the discovery of a vulnerability that might be exploited to launch denial of service attacks. The networking giant warned that malicious insiders could crash vulnerable systems running its Internetwork Operating System (IOS) software using maliciously crafted IPv6 packets.

Malign packets would need to be sent from the same local network segment as targeted devices, which need to be configured to process IPv6 traffic, increasing the difficulty of mounting a successful attack. But if these barriers are overcome compromised devices may be open to further exploitation, Cisco warns in an advisory. Security notification service Secunia rates the alert as "moderately critical"

Every Cisco device running any unfixed version of Cisco IOS code and configured to process IPv6 packets is potentially at risk. However the networking giant has released free software upgrades (details here) designed to shore up security defences.

Black Hat kerfuffle

Cisco published the advisory on Friday (29 July) two days after the vulnerability was disclosed at the Black Hat security conference in Vegas on Wednesday (27 July). The Black Hat presentation - during which security researcher Michael Lynn demonstrate mechanisms to remotely compromise Cisco routers and run malign code - was swiftly followed by a controversial gagging order from Cisco and Lynn's former employer ISS that saw materials from the talk ripped from conference proceedings. Lynn has agreed to turn over all materials from the talk and to avoid using any Cisco code in his possession for further reverse engineering or security research.

The advisory Cisco issued Friday concerns a local exploit not the possibility of running remote attacks that formed the cornerstone of Lynn's presentation. Nonetheless the advisory presents further fallout from Lynn's talk, and Cisco's response to it, that have together reignited the debate about the disclosure of security vulnerabilities. ®

Related stories

Cisco, ISS file suit against rogue researcher
Settlement reached in Cisco flaw dispute
Unholy trio pose DDoS risk for Cisco kit
VoIP security group goes on the defensive
Cisco takes IPv6 closer to the mainstream

Combat fraud and increase customer satisfaction

More from The Register

next story
Parent gabfest Mumsnet hit by SSL bug: My heart bleeds, grins hacker
Natter-board tells middle-class Britain to purée its passwords
Obama allows NSA to exploit 0-days: report
If the spooks say they need it, they get it
Web data BLEEDOUT: Users to feel the pain as Heartbleed bug revealed
Vendors and ISPs have work to do updating firmware - if it's possible to fix this
Samsung Galaxy S5 fingerprint scanner hacked in just 4 DAYS
Sammy's newbie cooked slower than iPhone, also costs more to build
Mounties always get their man: Heartbleed 'hacker', 19, CUFFED
Canadian teen accused of raiding tax computers using OpenSSL bug
Snowden-inspired crypto-email service Lavaboom launches
German service pays tribute to Lavabit
One year on: diplomatic fail as Chinese APT gangs get back to work
Mandiant says past 12 months shows Beijing won't call off its hackers
prev story

Whitepapers

Designing a defence for mobile apps
In this whitepaper learn the various considerations for defending mobile applications; from the mobile application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies needed to properly assess mobile applications risk.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.
Five 3D headsets to be won!
We were so impressed by the Durovis Dive headset we’ve asked the company to give some away to Reg readers.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Securing web applications made simple and scalable
In this whitepaper learn how automated security testing can provide a simple and scalable way to protect your web applications.