Feeds

Sybase to acquire Extended Systems

Will pay $71.3m for middleware, big Euro customer base

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup

Sybase is buying mobile data synchronisation specialist Extended Systems, paying $71.3m in cash for the company's technology, 2,500-odd enterprise customers and 180 employees.

The deal values Extended's shares at $4.46 each, rather more than the $3.44 they closed at yesterday. If the deal wins the support of Extended's shareholders, not to mention regulatory authorities, the sale should be completed in Q4.

When that happens, Sybase said, it will incorporate Extended into its iAnywhere Solutions mobile enterprise software division. The company said it was interested not only in Extended's technology, which it believes will complement its existing mobile database and device management offerings, but also the smaller firm's extensive European customer base.

In addition to its mobile enterprise products, Extended has built up a business offering device technology-enabling offerings, such as its Bluetooth protocol stack, which is used in the Palm Treo 650 smart phone.

Ironically, perhaps, Palm once agreed to buy Extended, back in March 2001, for $264m - rather more than the company is worth today. Two months later, having announced a ballooning quarterly loss on a steep decline in revenue, Palm pulled out of the deal.

Since then, Extended has gone on to license its protocol stacks to the likes of Texas Instruments, NEC and Qualcomm. In May this year, it reported a Q3 FY2005 net income of $2.2m (14 cents a share) on revenues of $11.57m, up 39 per cent year on year largely on account of Qualcomm and TI deals. ®

Related stories

Sybase buys UK company
Sybase invokes licence gag in flaw disclosure row
Sybase partners with IBM
Sybase's ASE expands
Palm halves Q4 revenue guidance, doubles loss
Palm buys Extended to fuel corporate push

Boost IT visibility and business value

More from The Register

next story
The Return of BSOD: Does ANYONE trust Microsoft patches?
Sysadmins, you're either fighting fires or seen as incompetents now
Munich considers dumping Linux for ... GULP ... Windows!
Give a penguinista a hug, the Outlook's not good for open source's poster child
Intel's Raspberry Pi rival Galileo can now run Windows
Behold the Internet of Things. Wintel Things
Microsoft cries UNINSTALL in the wake of Blue Screens of Death™
Cache crash causes contained choloric calamity
Eat up Martha! Microsoft slings handwriting recog into OneNote on Android
Freehand input on non-Windows kit for the first time
Linux kernel devs made to finger their dongles before contributing code
Two-factor auth enabled for Kernel.org repositories
prev story

Whitepapers

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup
IT departments are embracing cloud backup, but there’s a lot you need to know before choosing a service provider. Learn all the critical things you need to know.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Build a business case: developing custom apps
Learn how to maximize the value of custom applications by accelerating and simplifying their development.
Rethinking backup and recovery in the modern data center
Combining intelligence, operational analytics, and automation to enable efficient, data-driven IT organizations using the HP ABR approach.
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.