Feeds

Hitachi feeds 5,000 with miracle plum mountain

Good Lord!

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Reducing the cost and complexity of web vulnerability management

Any reader who has ever pondered just exactly what firms like Mitsubishi don't make will be well aware that Japanese firms have a talent for diversification. You know the scenario - some bloke starts off in 1947 knocking up radios from tins cans in his garden shed and by 2000 his multinational corporation is pumping out everything from flash chips to oil rigs.

We must, however, give a special mention to Hitachi, whose Global Storage Technologies division has become a world leader in the production of plums. And not just any old plums, but ripe, juicy plums all the better to fill the bellies of the most needy.

No, we didn't believe it either, but here's the press release:

Record-breaking Bay Area temperatures have added to early ripening of the plum crop on the campus of Hitachi Global Storage Technologies, prompting the San Jose-based company to harvest the bumper crop sooner than expected this year. On Sunday, July 31, Hitachi will organize a harvest that's expected to include more than 150 Hitachi employees and volunteers from Village Harvest, a nonprofit suburban harvesting cooperative in Santa Clara Valley.

Hitachi's 2003 plum harvestFurther proof of this plum-based philanthropy comes in the form of the 2003 harvest (part of which can been seen on the left), during which 100 volunteers harvested 8,453 pounds of plums.

A lot of plums, eh? Nah - that's as nothing compared to this year's expected yield of 10,000 pounds of plums, enough to feed well, you do the maths...

For the record, Village Harvest is a "nonprofit suburban harvesting cooperative in Santa Clara Valley, California, which brings together neighbors and community organizations to provide food for the hungry, preserve our heritage and skills, and promote sustainable use of urban resources".

Good stuff. We should at this point stick in something about Hitachi Global Storage Technologies, blah, disk drive, blah, storage capacity, blah blah blah, but instead we'll offer this link to a Yahoo! map of Prunedale, California, which industry analysts believe may be on Hitachi's global acquisition list. ®

Related stories

Hitachi has case of midrange storage madness
Hitachi caught swapping APIs with IBM . . . again
Hitachi ships 'world fastest' 100GB notebook HDD

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

More from The Register

next story
WRISTJOB LOVE BONANZA: justWatch sex app promises blind date hookups
Mankind shuffles into the future, five fingers at a time
Every billionaire needs a PANZER TANK, right? STOP THERE, Paul Allen
Angry Microsoftie hauls auctioneers to court over stalled Pzkw. IV 'deal'
Apple's Mr Havisham: Tim Cook says dead Steve Jobs' office has remained untouched
'I literally think about him every day' says biz baron's old friend
Flaming drone batteries ground commercial flight before takeoff
Passenger had Something To Declare, instead fiddled while plane burned
Cops apologise for leaving EXPLOSIVES in suitcase at airport
'Canine training exercise' SNAFU sees woman take home booming baggage
Oi, London thief. We KNOW what you're doing - our PRECRIME system warned us
Aye, shipmate, it be just like that Minority Report
prev story

Whitepapers

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk
A single remote control platform for user support is be key to providing an efficient helpdesk. Retain full control over the way in which screen and keystroke data is transmitted.
WIN a very cool portable ZX Spectrum
Win a one-off portable Spectrum built by legendary hardware hacker Ben Heck
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Security and trust: The backbone of doing business over the internet
Explores the current state of website security and the contributions Symantec is making to help organizations protect critical data and build trust with customers.