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Be 24 meg service to cost under £30 a month

Autumn launch expected

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Be - the broadband ISP that doesn't have any punters yet - has confirmed that its 24 meg service will cost less than £30 a month.

The broadband service from the local loop unbundling (LLU) operator is due to launch in London in the next couple of months once Be has installed its kit in 45 BT exchanges.

So far the LLU operator has declined to say how much its 24 meg service will cost. It's still keeping the price "under wraps" although a spokesman told us it would be "under £30".

The Register understands that the service - which is not thought to include caps or usage limits - could even be nearer £25 a month.

Earlier today Be announced plans to give all its punters a "Be Box" wireless router for free (actually, it's Thomson SpeedTouch 716g wireless router that normally retails for £116.99).

Three weeks ago Alcatel announced it had won a "multi-million Euro contract" to supply LLU kit to Be. ®

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