Feeds

Malware maelstrom menaces UK

Post-St Swithin's deluge

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

SANS - Survey on application security programs

Lock up your email servers - there's a blizzard of Windows malware out there.

Email security firm MessageLabs has blocked more than a thousand copies of an email worm called Breatel-A (AKA Reatle or Lebreat) which attempts to launch a denial of service attack on security vendor Symantec and opens up a backdoor on infected PCs. The virus is being sent with multiple attachment types, including many .cpl files (Windows Control Panel Files) that may not automatically be blocked by some content filters and firewalls as they are not widely used by virus writers.

Typically the infected emails pose as messages that can't be delivered or supposed problems with a user's email or bank account, both common virus writing ploys. The first copies of the virus blocked by MessageLabs originated in Northern Ireland.

And that's not all. More than 120,000 emails containing a downloader Trojan – called Small-BDQ - have been sent to UK businesses since Saturday night (16 July), according to email security company BlackSpider Technologies. Firms targeted vary in size and industry with the attack continuing into Monday morning (18 July). The content of the email poses as a message from a user's sys admin warning that their system has been compromised and is distributing spam. The attachment is a packed executable MEW file called zam.exe. The attachment (just 2.8KB) is programmed to download the main Trojan payload from the web.

John Cheney, BlackSpider chief exec, said: "The effects of the trojan have not yet been revealed but businesses should be aware that its purpose may well be out to discover sensitive corporate information; perhaps via a key-logging tool." ®

Related stories

VXers release 'London bombing' Trojan
Trojan downloader spam poses as admin email
Spyware blizzard shows no sign of let up
UK trojan siege has been running over a year
Window of exposure lets viruses run rampant

Combat fraud and increase customer satisfaction

More from The Register

next story
Parent gabfest Mumsnet hit by SSL bug: My heart bleeds, grins hacker
Natter-board tells middle-class Britain to purée its passwords
Samsung Galaxy S5 fingerprint scanner hacked in just 4 DAYS
Sammy's newbie cooked slower than iPhone, also costs more to build
Obama allows NSA to exploit 0-days: report
If the spooks say they need it, they get it
Web data BLEEDOUT: Users to feel the pain as Heartbleed bug revealed
Vendors and ISPs have work to do updating firmware - if it's possible to fix this
Snowden-inspired crypto-email service Lavaboom launches
German service pays tribute to Lavabit
One year on: diplomatic fail as Chinese APT gangs get back to work
Mandiant says past 12 months shows Beijing won't call off its hackers
Call of Duty 'fragged using OpenSSL's Heartbleed exploit'
So it begins ... or maybe not, says one analyst
prev story

Whitepapers

Designing a defence for mobile apps
In this whitepaper learn the various considerations for defending mobile applications; from the mobile application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies needed to properly assess mobile applications risk.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.
Five 3D headsets to be won!
We were so impressed by the Durovis Dive headset we’ve asked the company to give some away to Reg readers.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Securing web applications made simple and scalable
In this whitepaper learn how automated security testing can provide a simple and scalable way to protect your web applications.