Feeds

Microsoft's 'Chimney' stuffed by TCP/IP settlement

Alacritech - one of many

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Next gen security for virtualised datacentres

Microsoft has settled a patent dispute with networking start-up Alacritech. The deal will see the companies cross license some technology and have Microsoft pay Alacritech an undisclosed sum. We know, we know. Microsoft pays off smaller firm is a familiar plot line.

Alacritech specializes in making TCP/IP offloading technology. In particular, it makes TOE (TCP/IP offload engines) cards that many once predicted would be key in the storage and server industries, as customers looked to divert networking traffic from processors. The technology hasn't taken off as well as Alacritech and others hoped. Nonetheless, Microsoft uses such TCP/IP offloading in a project code-name "Chimney" to give Windows a boost.

While present in Windows Server 2003, the offloading goods are really supposed to shine in Longhorn.

Alacritech also formed a cross-licensing deal with Broadcom.

"Alacritech’s patent cross-licenses with Microsoft and Broadcom provide Alacritech with access to certain Microsoft and Broadcom networking patents. Alacritech’s agreements with Microsoft and Broadcom include fees in undisclosed amounts paid to Alacritech. Collectively the agreements enable the three companies to work together to further expand the range of customer solutions available for scalable networked systems," Alacritech said.

In April, Alacritech won a preliminary injunction against Redmond.

Processor makers such as Sun Microsystems and Intel have been busy building similar networking aids into their chips. The rise of multicore processors that can handle different types of workloads could lessen the need for separate server cards that do similar things. Specialized software, of course, also plays a large role in these tasks.

All the vendors are looking to lessen the burden that crunching through the TCP/IP stack demands of current hardware. This problem is expected to worsen as technology such as iSCSI makes it possible to send large chunks of data over IP. ®

Related stories

Start-up reckons it can give you twice the processor
Microsoft loses Excel patent case
Patent injunction knocks Longhorn
Intel to attack greedy TCP/IP stack
Adaptec tempts mobo makers with Serial ATA
Sun gives glimpse of revised Solaris TCP/IP stack

The essential guide to IT transformation

More from The Register

next story
The Return of BSOD: Does ANYONE trust Microsoft patches?
Sysadmins, you're either fighting fires or seen as incompetents now
Microsoft: Azure isn't ready for biz-critical apps … yet
Microsoft will move its own IT to the cloud to avoid $200m server bill
Oracle reveals 32-core, 10 BEEELLION-transistor SPARC M7
New chip scales to 1024 cores, 8192 threads 64 TB RAM, at speeds over 3.6GHz
US regulators OK sale of IBM's x86 server biz to Lenovo
Now all that remains is for gov't offices to ban the boxes
Object storage bods Exablox: RAID is dead, baby. RAID is dead
Bring your own disks to its object appliances
Nimble's latest mutants GORGE themselves on unlucky forerunners
Crossing Sandy Bridges without stopping for breath
prev story

Whitepapers

Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
7 Elements of Radically Simple OS Migration
Avoid the typical headaches of OS migration during your next project by learning about 7 elements of radically simple OS migration.
BYOD's dark side: Data protection
An endpoint data protection solution that adds value to the user and the organization so it can protect itself from data loss as well as leverage corporate data.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?