Feeds

Intel and Dell thrilled to join the dual-core server chip era

Leaders arrive last with PC part

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

3 Big data security analytics techniques

When you're the world's biggest chipmaker and have fallen years behind rivals by not having a dual-core server processor, you make damn sure your dual-core desktop processor does all it can.

Intel today released the dual-core Pentium D chip and complementary E7230 chipset, making it possible for customers to cram a dual-core part meant for PCs into single socket, low-end servers. With the new chip, Intel has managed to quiet a few of the snickers coming from rivals such as IBM, Sun Microsystems and AMD who have spent months and in some cases years hawking dual-core server chips. The real dual-core server dandies from Intel - new Itanium and Xeon chips - won't start trickling in until the end of this year.

In the meantime, Intel has proven that it can take care of the lowest volume markets with its dual-core products. First, it nailed the gamer segment with a dual-core Pentium Extreme Edition chip and now it can shovel a real file and print workhorse at SMBs with the Pentium D chip for servers.

Dell, the lone Tier 1 server maker not to have a dual-core processor-powered server on the market, rushed to support the new chip and chipset.

The PowerEdge SC430 will hold a single Pentium D and has 50 per cent more storage and 50 per cent more PCI Express slots than its predecessor the PowerEdge SC420. It's this marvel of engineering that's meant to help Dell save face as HP, Sun and IBM sell thousands of dual-core Opteron servers over the coming months. Such sales aren't likely to hurt Dell in the short-term but inviting fierce rivals to bid on accounts - and do so with servers that outperform Xeon-based systems on myriad benchmarks - must be disconcerting.

Oh well.

If you are a Dell customer clamoring to taste the dual-core lifestyle, you'll be pleased to know the new box supports 32bit and 64bit versions of server operating systems from Microsoft, Red Hat and Novell (Linux, not NetWare). The box starts at $499 can be had with a 2.53GHz Celeron (cough), a 3.0GHz P4 or the 3.2GHz Pentium D. It also supports up to 4GB of memory, 3 PCI Express slots and SATA or Ultra320 SCSI drives.

AMD has pointed to Dell's curious lack of dual-core servers as evidence that backs up its recent antitrust claims against Intel. Dell, however, has maintained that Intel will deliver dual-core products soon enough for its tastes. So the Texan company that prides itself on putting new components into its kit well ahead of the competition can live with being last to the dual-core race. Who would have thunk it? ®

Related stories

Dixons disses AMD claims
Intel to add VT to P4 in Q4
AMD to drive dual-core downmarket
Acer pitches Opteron kit at SMBs
AMD Japan sues Intel for $50m damages - and then some
Can anyone compete with Intel? AMD says, 'No!'
AMD files anti-trust suit against Intel
Sun tries to lure developers with cheap Opteron workstation

SANS - Survey on application security programs

More from The Register

next story
This time it's 'Personal': new Office 365 sub covers just two devices
Redmond also brings Office into Google's back yard
Dropbox defends fantastically badly timed Condoleezza Rice appointment
'Nothing is going to change with Dr. Rice's appointment,' file sharer promises
Bored with trading oil and gold? Why not flog some CLOUD servers?
Chicago Mercantile Exchange plans cloud spot exchange
Just what could be inside Dropbox's new 'Home For Life'?
Biz apps, messaging, photos, email, more storage – sorry, did you think there would be cake?
IT bods: How long does it take YOU to train up on new tech?
I'll leave my arrays to do the hard work, if you don't mind
Amazon reveals its Google-killing 'R3' server instances
A mega-memory instance that never forgets
Cisco reps flog Whiptail's Invicta arrays against EMC and Pure
Storage reseller report reveals who's selling what
prev story

Whitepapers

Designing a defence for mobile apps
In this whitepaper learn the various considerations for defending mobile applications; from the mobile application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies needed to properly assess mobile applications risk.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.
Five 3D headsets to be won!
We were so impressed by the Durovis Dive headset we’ve asked the company to give some away to Reg readers.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Securing web applications made simple and scalable
In this whitepaper learn how automated security testing can provide a simple and scalable way to protect your web applications.