Feeds

Engineers repair Pakistan net connection

At last

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Internet Security Threat Report 2014

A major undersea fibre-optic cable linking Pakistan to the rest of the world has been repaired ten days after it went titsup.

The damage to the Southeast Asia-Middle East-Western Europe-3 (SEA-ME-WE3) cable had interrupted communications services in the country since it went down on 27 June and made life extremely tricky for Pakistan's ten million net users.

Earlier this week it was reported that engineers on the repair ship sent to fix the cable in the Arabian Sea had failed to locate the damaged cable.

But reports from Pakistan today confirm that the cable has now been repaired.

Pakistan paper Dawn quoted a senior spokesman for telco PTCL as saying: "The fault in the cable has been repaired completely and full service was restored at 11.54 this morning (0654 GMT)." ®

Related stories

Pakistan cable break still not found
Severed undersea cable cuts off Pakistan
Police arrest telecoms workers in Pakistan
Norway mobile service floored - report
Rats fingered for knocking out NZ's phone network
New Zealand floored by cable outage

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

Whitepapers

Choosing cloud Backup services
Demystify how you can address your data protection needs in your small- to medium-sized business and select the best online backup service to meet your needs.
Getting started with customer-focused identity management
Learn why identity is a fundamental requirement to digital growth, and how without it there is no way to identify and engage customers in a meaningful way.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Intelligent flash storage arrays
Tegile Intelligent Storage Arrays with IntelliFlash helps IT boost storage utilization and effciency while delivering unmatched storage savings and performance.
The Heartbleed Bug: how to protect your business with Symantec
What happens when the next Heartbleed (or worse) comes along, and what can you do to weather another chapter in an all-too-familiar string of debilitating attacks?