Feeds

IBM 'really committed' to Java community

Public display of affection

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

The Power of One Brief: Top reasons to choose HP BladeSystem

IBM made a public show of its love for all things Java on Wednesday, following an agreement to renew its Java license with Sun Microsystems for the next 10 years.

One of the sticking points in the relationship between IBM and Sun has been Sun's continued power to control Java through the Java Community Process (JCP). That has lead IBM to form alternative industry groups, such as the Eclipse, in opposition to Sun and the JCP. Eclipse started life building a framework for Java tools but has since morphed in scope and attracted more than 100 members. Only one major Java platform provider today remains a non-member of Eclipse - Sun.

On Monday, Sun's president and chief operating officer Jonathan Schwartz - announcing IBM's renewed license, said: "We had a bit of a chill in our relationship with IBM."

Speaking on Wednesday, Robert LeBlanc, IBM WebSphere general manager, LeBlanc concurred: "We have had our little differences [with Sun] in terms of the process." He added, though, IBM would "continue to participate and drive [changes] through the community"

LeBlanc said it was important to work through the community to drive changes that take Java beyond the data center into newer areas like mobile phones, where technical hurdles remain to be overcome. Working through the community is important, because this would help maintain compatibility, LeBlanc said.

LeBlanc's words, and IBM's new license, probably owe more to necessity than goodwill as much of IBM's software business relies on Java. WebSphere is IBM's core brand for Java, with IBM investing $1bn on an annual basis. Elements of WebSphere are also now moving into IBM's Tivoli, Rational, Lotus and Workplace products.

"We are as dependent on Java being a success as any other single vendor in the industry," said LeBlanc. ®

Related stories

IBM gets 10 years under Sun
Oracle seeks to align Eclipse with Sun's Java
IBM preps Eclipse application server challenge
Sun won't be Eclipse'd

Securing Web Applications Made Simple and Scalable

More from The Register

next story
Whoah! How many Google Play apps want to read your texts?
Google's app permissions far too lax – security firm survey
Chrome browser has been DRAINING PC batteries for YEARS
Google is only now fixing ancient, energy-sapping bug
Do YOU work at Microsoft? Um. Are you SURE about that?
Nokia and marketing types first to get the bullet, says report
Microsoft takes on Chromebook with low-cost Windows laptops
Redmond's chief salesman: We're taking 'hard' decisions
EU dons gloves, pokes Google's deals with Android mobe makers
El Reg cops a squint at investigatory letters
Big Blue Apple: IBM to sell iPads, iPhones to enterprises
iOS/2 gear loaded with apps for big biz ... uh oh BlackBerry
OpenWRT gets native IPv6 slurping in major refresh
Also faster init and a new packages system
prev story

Whitepapers

Top three mobile application threats
Prevent sensitive data leakage over insecure channels or stolen mobile devices.
The Essential Guide to IT Transformation
ServiceNow discusses three IT transformations that can help CIO's automate IT services to transform IT and the enterprise.
Mobile application security vulnerability report
The alarming realities regarding the sheer number of applications vulnerable to attack, and the most common and easily addressable vulnerability errors.
How modern custom applications can spur business growth
Learn how to create, deploy and manage custom applications without consuming or expanding the need for scarce, expensive IT resources.
Consolidation: the foundation for IT and business transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.