Feeds

Net radio station silenced after phishing bust

No Song of Norway

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Build a business case: developing custom apps

A Norwegian internet radio station was shut down temporarily earlier this week because one of its employees allegedly ran an eBay phishing scam.

eBay filed a complaint with the FBI after it discovered that the Norwegian was somehow involved with a credit card fraud operation. The worker purportedly copied one of eBay's web pages and coded it in such a way that credit card numbers and personal information were sent to him.

Because the man worked for NordicRadio, eBay asked the internet radio station's hosting firm to shut down the site. According to the FBI, which investigated the scam from the US, the fraudulent pages were uploaded through the radio station's servers. Although there is no proof that that the station actively facilitated the scam, the station bank account remains frozen as a precaution.

The suspect has stepped down from his job at NordicRadio and expressed his bewilderment with the charges, Norwegian daily Afterposten reports.

Norway's National Criminal Investigation Service (NCIS) is still investigating. ®

Next gen security for virtualised datacentres

Whitepapers

Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Endpoint data privacy in the cloud is easier than you think
Innovations in encryption and storage resolve issues of data privacy and key requirements for companies to look for in a solution.
Scale data protection with your virtual environment
To scale at the rate of virtualization growth, data protection solutions need to adopt new capabilities and simplify current features.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?