Feeds

Sun opens more middleware source, plots Java future

But where's the money?

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile

JavaOne Sun Microsystems has released more code from its middleware stack, including elements of an integration standard built for Service Oriented Architectures (SOAs).

Sun is releasing its Java System Application Server Platform Edition 9.0 and the Java System Enterprise Service Bus (ESB) under the Common Development and Distribution License (CDDL). The Java ESB is Sun's first implementation of the Java Business Integration (JBI) specification, developed by the Java Community Process (JCP) to let integration technologies and web services to talk to each other.

Sun also announced that JBI is being supported by 19 infrastructure and integration vendors, all promising to deliver JBI-based products within the next 12 months. Companies backing JBI include Cape Clear, SeeBeyond and TIBCO Software. JBI was ratified by the JCP earlier this month. JBI provides a standard way for integration technologies to communicate with each other, while also telling the ESB which elements make up an application or service in a distributed SOA.

The release follows Sun's posting of millions of lines of Solaris 10 code earlier this month following the launch of OpenSolaris - the open source edition of Solaris 10.

Sun is also making APIs for platform editions of Java, notably Java 2 Standard Edition, now Java Platform Standard Edition (Java SE), available for review under three licenses. Sun is making Java SE APIs available as it builds J SE 6.

Company president Jonathan Schwartz said that in opening its code, Sun would create a community of developers using the APIs in products. Tackling the whole concept of Free Open Source Software (FOSS), Schwartz said his 'bias' is towards the 'free' aspect of the equation. "The most popular FOSS products in the world are free," he said, highlighting OpenOffice, Mozilla, Firefox and Linux.

"There is a social utility to free software," Schwartz said.

Less clear, though, was how Sun will turn its code giveaway into revenue. Appearing at JavaOne, Sun chairman and chief executive officer (CEO) Scott McNealy said simply it would be easier for Sun, along other Java community members, to make a little money on a lot of people in a large community than to monetize a small community.

Meanwhile, Sun outlined technology roadmaps for J SE 6 and 7. J SE 6 will feature improved performance, an interface with a Microsoft Longhorn look and feel, and support for client-side web services. J SE 7 will see support added for dynamic languages and easier administration, with real-time deployment, and remote administration via the JMX API. Sun made the announcements on the opening day of its JavaOne 2005 conference in San Francisco, California.®

Related stories

Sun coughs up an OpenSolaris kernel
Sun plays hide and seek with key Solaris 10 goodies
OpenSolaris makes Sun top donor of open source code
'Get a lawyer!' Sun tells developers

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk

More from The Register

next story
Google+ goes TITSUP. But WHO knew? How long? Anyone ... Hello ...
Wobbly Gmail, Contacts, Calendar on the other hand ...
Preview redux: Microsoft ships new Windows 10 build with 7,000 changes
Latest bleeding-edge bits borrow Action Center from Windows Phone
Microsoft promises Windows 10 will mean two-factor auth for all
Sneak peek at security features Redmond's baking into new OS
Google opens Inbox – email for people too thick to handle email
Print this article out and give it to someone tech-y if you get stuck
UNIX greybeards threaten Debian fork over systemd plan
'Veteran Unix Admins' fear desktop emphasis is betraying open source
DEATH by PowerPoint: Microsoft warns of 0-day attack hidden in slides
Might put out patch in update, might chuck it out sooner
Redmond top man Satya Nadella: 'Microsoft LOVES Linux'
Open-source 'love' fairly runneth over at cloud event
prev story

Whitepapers

Cloud and hybrid-cloud data protection for VMware
Learn how quick and easy it is to configure backups and perform restores for VMware environments.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Three 1TB solid state scorchers up for grabs
Big SSDs can be expensive but think big and think free because you could be the lucky winner of one of three 1TB Samsung SSD 840 EVO drives that we’re giving away worth over £300 apiece.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.