The Sun exposes UK ID theft racket at Indian call centre

My bank details went to Bangalore

Update An undercover reporter was able to buy the details thousands of UK banking accounts, password particulars and credit cards numbers from crooked call centre workers in India, The Sun reports.

The paper says one of its journalists bought details of 1,000 UK banking customers from an IT worker in Delhi for £4.25 each. The IT worker has denied the claims in an radio interview with the BBC.

The Sun's reporter was also able to buy the numbers of credit cards and account passwords. An unnamed security expert hired by the paper verified that the details were genuine. The information sold could be readily exploited by ID thieves to apply for credit cards or loans under assumed identities or to simply loot compromised accounts. The call centre worker bragged that he could sell up to 200,000 account details each month.

The Sun handed over a dossier on its investigation to the City of London Police. In a statement, the City of London Police said: "Unfortunately we have no jurisdiction to prosecute this in the UK. However we have passed information through Interpol to the Indian authorities and will be working with them to secure the prosecution of this individual.".

Amicus, the union, said the case highlighted possible data protection risks about moving financial services overseas. "Companies that have offshore jobs need to reflect on their decision and the assumption that cost savings benefiting them and their shareholders outweigh consumer confidentiality and confidence," Dave Fleming, senior finance officer, told the BBC. ®

Related stories

India acts on call centre fraud
Police arrest telecoms workers in Pakistan
IT security to go offshore. Maybe
US bank staff 'sold customer details'
Backup tapes are backdoor for ID thieves
UK card fraud hits £505m

Sponsored: 5 critical considerations for enterprise cloud backup