Feeds

AMD sets Q3 release for workstation-happy, dual-core Opterons

100 Series prepares for liftoff

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Protecting against web application threats using SSL

It's getting warm here in Chicago, and the birds are out in full force. Thankfully, one rather knowledgeable chirper stopped by the office today with a short but concrete message about AMD's Opteron plans.

In the next couple of days, AMD will deliver word that the dual-core version of Opteron meant for one-socket workstations and low-end servers will ship in the third quarter. This 100 Series processor follows the 800 series chips that arrived for midrange servers in April and the new 200 Series for one- to two-way servers.

Is this a surprise? Well, no.

Given that we're already in June, it would be hard to imagine AMD stretching must past the third quarter to deliver such a chip. The likes of HP, Sun and smaller hardware makers will be expected to use the 100 Series processors.

Our sources indicate that AMD has received tremendous interest in its dual-core chips with orders for more expensive, higher-powered versions of Opteron exceeding expectations by leaps and bounds. AMD is hoping to capitalize on a more than six-month lead over Intel, which won't have a dual-core Xeon until 2006.

AMD, however, could use a major dual-core boost since it has fallen well behind initial shipment expectations for the Opteron processor. The company once predicted that it would grab 10 per cent of the server processor market by the end of 2004. Instead, AMD held just 6.5 per cent of the market in both last year's fourth quarter and this year's first quarter, according to IDC.

In a recent interview with InfoWorld, AMD CEO Hector Ruiz ignored IDC's most recent numbers and put out a bold prediction for 2005.

"If you believe the IDC numbers, then we ended up the year around 8 per cent share. I would be very disappointed, stunned, and surprised if we don't go out this year with at least a 50 per cent growth over that, which puts us at a minimum of 12 per cent."

Or if you use the real IDC figures, at still less than 10 per cent (9.75) - AMD's original goal for 2004. ®

Related stories

HP dresses up ProLiants with dual-core Opterons
IBM and Intel punish supercomputing rivals
HP's Mr Blade opens Intel's power envelope to all

Choosing a cloud hosting partner with confidence

More from The Register

next story
Wanna keep your data for 1,000 YEARS? No? Hard luck, HDS wants you to anyway
Combine Blu-ray and M-DISC and you get this monster
US boffins demo 'twisted radio' mux
OAM takes wireless signals to 32 Gbps
Google+ GOING, GOING ... ? Newbie Gmailers no longer forced into mandatory ID slurp
Mountain View distances itself from lame 'network thingy'
Apple flops out 2FA for iCloud in bid to stop future nude selfie leaks
Millions of 4chan users howl with laughter as Cupertino slams stable door
Students playing with impressive racks? Yes, it's cluster comp time
The most comprehensive coverage the world has ever seen. Ever
Run little spreadsheet, run! IBM's Watson is coming to gobble you up
Big Blue's big super's big appetite for big data in big clouds for big analytics
Seagate's triple-headed Cerberus could SAVE the DISK WORLD
... and possibly bring us even more HAMR time. Yay!
prev story

Whitepapers

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.
WIN a very cool portable ZX Spectrum
Win a one-off portable Spectrum built by legendary hardware hacker Ben Heck
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.