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Samsung files SMS recall patent

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Samsung has patented a method to allow users the recall an SMS message. The approach offers an opportunity to delete embarrassing texts providing recipients haven't already read a message, so chastened texters would need to act quickly.

The technology involves development of a phone that can send a "delete request" message to the receiver's mobile phone, requesting deletion of a potentially embarrassing SMS.

Hopefully this will work better than email message recall which often only serves to highlight that someone regrets sending a message. It's unclear if and when handsets with delete functionality will become available, Mobile Burn reports. Details of Samsung's SMS recall patent application can be found here. ®

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