Feeds

Boffins take new angle on anti-aging research

We'll all die before we get old...

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Next gen security for virtualised datacentres

Scientists in New York and Vienna have proposed a new way of looking at aging that they say explains why despite an aging population, people are behaving as though they are younger than their years.

All sounds fine and dandy, until you get to the bit where they explain what they actually mean. Rather than looking at age as the number of years you have already lived, look at it from the other angle: how many more years are you likely to be taking up breathing room on the planet?

As expected life spans increase, the average person could, the scientists argue, have more and more years to live as time passes. Figures published in Nature this week support this argument. In 2000, the average age in Germany was 39.9 years, and the average life span was 79.1 years. By 2050, these figures are likely to have hit 51.9 and 89 respectively. This means a 52 year-old in 2050 could expect to live almost as long as a 40 year-old in 2000.

Warren Sanderson of the University of New York in Stony Brook argues that this means people are behaving as though they are younger. "As people have more and more years to live they have to save more and plan more," he explained to Reuters.

Excuse us, but if memory serves, young people don't save their cash or plan retirement. Young people go out, get horribly drunk, shag each other and fall over. Middle-aged people worry about pensions (you should see the looks of concern whenever the word is mentioned in this office, for instance).

We are left with the uncomfortable suspicion that these scientists are either trying to redefine age so that they can lie about their own on a scientific basis, or that they were never young.

What these scientists are actually saying, is that although tempus still fugit, we know we're likely to live longer than previous generations. It is not that we are behaving as though we are younger, but as though we know we are going to get a lot older. ®

Related stories

Greenies want limits on ocean sonar
Big-O problems may be down to genes
Swiss neurologists to model the brain

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
Our LOHAN spaceplane ballocket Kickstarter climbs through £8000
Through 25 per cent but more is needed: Get your UNIQUE rewards!
LOHAN tunes into ultra long range radio
And verily, Vultures shall speak status unto distant receivers
NASA to reformat Opportunity rover's memory from 125 million miles away
Interplanetary admins will back up data and get to work
SpaceX prototype rocket EXPLODES over Texas. 'Tricky' biz, says Elon Musk
No injuries or near injuries. Flight stayed in designated area
EOS, Lockheed to track space junk from Oz
WA facility gets laser-eyes out of the fog
Volcanic eruption in Iceland triggers CODE RED aviation warning
Lava-spitting Bárðarbunga prompts action from Met Office
LOHAN Kickstarter breaks NINETEEN THOUSAND of your EARTH POUNDS
That's right, OVER 9,000 beer tokens - and counting
prev story

Whitepapers

Endpoint data privacy in the cloud is easier than you think
Innovations in encryption and storage resolve issues of data privacy and key requirements for companies to look for in a solution.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Advanced data protection for your virtualized environments
Find a natural fit for optimizing protection for the often resource-constrained data protection process found in virtual environments.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.