Feeds

Brit hack suspect faces extradition fight

Alleged Pentagon raider arrested

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Security for virtualized datacentres

Update A Briton suspected of hacking into numerous US military and NASA computers faces an extradition fight following his arrest in London on Tuesday. Gary McKinnon (AKA Solo), 39, of Wood Green, north London, allegedly hacked into 53 military and NASA computers over a 12 month period from February 2001 until March 2002. The unemployed sysadmin is due to appear in London's Bow Street Magistrates Court on Wednesday (8 June).

The US government claims it spent $1m fixing the damage allegedly caused by McKinnon, who was indicted in 2002 by a Federal Grand Jury over eight computer crime offences. The offences are punishable on conviction by up to five years in prison.

McKinnon allegedly exploited poorly-secured Windows systems to attack networks run by NASA, the Pentagon and 12 other military installations scattered over 14 states. Private sector businesses were also affected by the alleged attacks.

According to court papers, McKinnon mounted an attack in February 2002 that shut down Internet access to 2,000 military computers in the Washington area for three days. He is accused of scanning networks for vulnerabilities prior to using a software program called RemotelyAnywhere to snoop on network traffic and erase files. Despite the seriousness of the alleged attacks, US authorities are keen to stress no classified information was obtained through the year long assaults. Authorities reckon McKinnon acted alone and are not attributing his alleged crimes to any terrorist motive. ®

Update

At the hearing on Wednesday, McKinnon was released on bail by magistrates pending an extradition hearing scheduled for 27 July. Karen Todner, McKinnon's lawyer, said her client would "vigorously" contest the extradition.

"We believe that as a British national, he should be tried here in our courts by a British jury and not in the US," she said.

Related stories

Brit charged with hacking Pentagon, NASA
Accused Pentagon Hacker's Online Life
Pentagon hacker Analyzer pleads guilty

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
Russian hackers exploit 'Sandworm' bug 'to spy on NATO, EU PCs'
Fix imminent from Microsoft for Vista, Server 2008, other stuff
Microsoft pulls another dodgy patch
Redmond makes a hash of hashing add-on
FYI: OS X Yosemite's Spotlight tells Apple EVERYTHING you're looking for
It's on by default – didn't you read the small print?
'LulzSec leader Aush0k' found to be naughty boy not worthy of jail
15 months home detention leaves egg on feds' faces as they grab for more power
Forget passwords, let's use SELFIES, says Obama's cyber tsar
Michael Daniel wants to kill passwords dead
FBI boss: We don't want a backdoor, we want the front door to phones
Claims it's what the Founding Fathers would have wanted – catching killers and pedos
Kill off SSL 3.0 NOW: HTTPS savaged by vicious POODLE
Pull it out ASAP, it is SWISS CHEESE
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Why cloud backup?
Combining the latest advancements in disk-based backup with secure, integrated, cloud technologies offer organizations fast and assured recovery of their critical enterprise data.
Win a year’s supply of chocolate
There is no techie angle to this competition so we're not going to pretend there is, but everyone loves chocolate so who cares.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Intelligent flash storage arrays
Tegile Intelligent Storage Arrays with IntelliFlash helps IT boost storage utilization and effciency while delivering unmatched storage savings and performance.