Feeds

EC wants to cap data retention laws

Delete data after a year

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Eight steps to building an HP BladeSystem

The European Commission has stepped into the debate on the proposed data retention bill, saying that the legislation will now require telcos and ISPs to hold onto data for a year, rather that the three or four years originally proposed.

The decision follows a vote from the civil liberties committee to reject the original plans as "disproportionate and ineffective", as well as serious concerns over the legality of the proposed legislation.

The bill was put together, some argue hastily, in the wake of the Madrid train bombings which killed 191 people. Telephone records were reportedly a key part in the police investigation, and allowed them to make quick arrests.

It was put forward by the UK. France, Ireland and Sweden, but following legal advice, the member states now suggest that the bill be proposed by the Commission, rather than by individual countries. This would mean the laws would need to be given the OK by Parliament and the member states, Reuters reports.

Information Society Commissioner Viviane Reding also says the bill should encompass wider issues than just fighting terrorism, saying that there needed to be a balance between the need for security, and the need for privacy.

In its original form, the draft did not state an explicit upper limit on how long data could or should be kept. The draft also failed to delineate between data and content, causing concern among civil liberties campaigners, and among the businesses it would affect.

"It will certainly not be three to four years but a maximum of one year and I hope even less," Reding told Reuters.

While all this sounds very positive - many of the concerns raised when the original document was published do seem to be being addressed - it remains to be seen how these good intentions will affect the bill. The Commission is expected to publish its new proposal in June or July. Until then, we will have to wait and see. ®

Related stories

EU's data retention laws could be illegal
UK and EU allies plan moves against terror websites
EC calls for rethink of data retention proposals

Maximizing your infrastructure through virtualization

More from The Register

next story
Airbus promises Wi-Fi – yay – and 3D movies (meh) in new A330
If the person in front reclines their seat, this could get interesting
BBC goes offline in MASSIVE COCKUP: Stephen Fry partly muzzled
Auntie tight-lipped as major outage rolls on
There's NOTHING on TV in Europe – American video DOMINATES
Even France's mega subsidies don't stop US content onslaught
UK Parliament rubber-stamps EMERGENCY data grab 'n' keep bill
Just 49 MPs oppose Drip's rushed timetable
Want to beat Verizon's slow Netflix? Get a VPN
Exec finds stream speed climbs when smuggled out
Samsung threatens to cut ties with supplier over child labour allegations
Vows to uphold 'zero tolerance' policy on underage workers
Dude, you're getting a Dell – with BITCOIN: IT giant slurps cryptocash
1. Buy PC with Bitcoin. 2. Mine more coins. 3. Goto step 1
prev story

Whitepapers

Top three mobile application threats
Prevent sensitive data leakage over insecure channels or stolen mobile devices.
The Essential Guide to IT Transformation
ServiceNow discusses three IT transformations that can help CIO's automate IT services to transform IT and the enterprise.
Mobile application security vulnerability report
The alarming realities regarding the sheer number of applications vulnerable to attack, and the most common and easily addressable vulnerability errors.
How modern custom applications can spur business growth
Learn how to create, deploy and manage custom applications without consuming or expanding the need for scarce, expensive IT resources.
Consolidation: the foundation for IT and business transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.