Feeds

Chips hit squall in April

SIA confident on full year

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

The chip industry’s fight back hit the ropes in April, dropping 1.2 per cent on the previous month.

Total chip sales were $18.2bn in April, compared to $18.4bn in March, the Semiconductor Industry Association reported today. This was 6.9 per cent up on the previous year, a comparatively limp rise.

The trade group put the drop down to a resumption of normal buying patterns in the cell phone market pushing ASPs down, and a decline in DRAM prices.

Nevertheless, the group insisted the outlook for the year as a whole remained strong, with excess inventory now flushed from the market and capacity utilization at reasonable levels.

Americas sales were $3.22bn, down 0.7 per cent sequentially, but up 1 per cent on the year. European sales were down 1.6 per cent sequentially, and up 3 per cent on the year. Japan was down 3.4 per cent on the month to $3.71bn, though this was up 1 per cent on the year. Asia Pacific sales were down 0.1 per cent sequentially to $7.9bn, but up 14.4 per cent on the year.

Related stories

World chip sales continue to rise
World chip sales down in February
Silicon Valley pleads for Federal aid
Chip glut ebbs
World chip sales down in December

Whitepapers

Cloud and hybrid-cloud data protection for VMware
Learn how quick and easy it is to configure backups and perform restores for VMware environments.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Three 1TB solid state scorchers up for grabs
Big SSDs can be expensive but think big and think free because you could be the lucky winner of one of three 1TB Samsung SSD 840 EVO drives that we’re giving away worth over £300 apiece.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.