Feeds

Sly Intel CEO warns that Apple is the safer computer buy

But, if you upgrade . . .

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

The essential guide to IT transformation

New Intel CEO Paul Otellini has flashed a level of marketing savvy unseen with his predecessor by making the unusual suggestion that consumers buy Apple's Mac computers if they wish to avoid immediate security risks.

Confused? You're not alone. Otellini had attendees of a Wall Street Journal technology conference in Carlsbad, California scratching their silicon this week, as they puzzled through his pro-Mac statements. The paper recounts the episode as follows;

Pressed about security by (a reporter), Mr Otellini had a startling confession: He spends an hour a weekend removing spyware from his daughter's computer. And when further pressed about whether a mainstream computer user in search of immediate safety from security woes ought to buy Apple Computer Inc.'s Macintosh instead of a Wintel PC, he said, "If you want to fix it tomorrow, maybe you should buy something else."

Apple advocates will, of course, declare that Otellini is speaking the gospel. Others will claim Otellini's statement is really a public flirtation for Apple Chief Steve "Bono" Jobs, who has been rumored to want a line of Intel-based PCs.

We suspect the truth is a little more prosaic.

Isn't Otellini, who this month took over the CEO post from Craig Barrett, simply laying the groundwork for a long, merciless marketing campaign?

Your current computers are insecure. They're frightening. They're disasters. They are a risk to your business and your home. It's upgrade or die time, friends.

Or so the less subtle message goes.

Intel today, in fact, released a new desktop platform, which includes improved security tools for business customers such as being able to audit PCs and contain viruses. What a coincidence.

Intel has been trying to push this "platform" idea on customers now that it's unable to rely solely on improved GHz as the main sales point of new product. Changes in chip manufacturing mean that processors will arrive at close to the same speeds as their predecessors but with more tools for churning through different types of software better and for even more advanced functions such as running multiple operating systems on the same chip. A big chunk of the platform idea is better security for Intel. And it will roll out lots of jazzy things for keeping code under control.

In a larger context, Otellini is clearly waving the flag now for this future product, saying the PCs you have really must be replaced if you want to operate a secure business. It's nice that Microsoft and Intel can benefit from the insecure world they've nurtured for so long.

Until Intel's goodies arrive, Apple may sell a couple more Macs because of Otellini's advertisement. But even Apple's best quarter is hardly noticed at Intel. Otellini clearly knows what he's doing. ®

Related stories

Fearless Feds sink Star Wars pirate website
GoogleNet - the ultimate embrace and extend?
SMT vulnerability 'not critical' - Intel
Intel partner sues... Intel (and AMD too)
That classified US military report's secrets in full

Next gen security for virtualised datacentres

More from The Register

next story
Snowden on NSA's MonsterMind TERROR: It may trigger cyberwar
Plus: Syria's internet going down? That was a US cock-up
Who needs hackers? 'Password1' opens a third of all biz doors
GPU-powered pen test yields more bad news about defences and passwords
e-Borders fiasco: Brits stung for £224m after US IT giant sues UK govt
Defeat to Raytheon branded 'catastrophic result'
Microsoft cries UNINSTALL in the wake of Blue Screens of Death™
Cache crash causes contained choloric calamity
Germany 'accidentally' snooped on John Kerry and Hillary Clinton
Dragnet surveillance picks up EVERYTHING, USA, m'kay?
Linux kernel devs made to finger their dongles before contributing code
Two-factor auth enabled for Kernel.org repositories
prev story

Whitepapers

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup
IT departments are embracing cloud backup, but there’s a lot you need to know before choosing a service provider. Learn all the critical things you need to know.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Build a business case: developing custom apps
Learn how to maximize the value of custom applications by accelerating and simplifying their development.
Rethinking backup and recovery in the modern data center
Combining intelligence, operational analytics, and automation to enable efficient, data-driven IT organizations using the HP ABR approach.
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.