Feeds

Now Microsoft 'decouples' Longhorn from .NET

More code overboard

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

SANS - Survey on application security programs

A security architecture touted as one of the core benefits of Microsoft's next major Windows upgrade look like being the next casualty of the Longhorn death march.

Mary Jo Foley reports that only some parts of Longhorn will be based on .NET 2.0, rather than the entire OS, as originally intended. If this latest bout of indigestion is true, developers gain compatibility at the expense of the superior developer environment of .NET.

But the casualty, as we predicted a year ago, looks like being the ground-up Managed Code architecture which forbids one process from hijacking another: a favorite ploy of malware. (Managed Code is very succinctly summarized here.) So Managed Code is a good thing: a key weapon in the war against viruses.

It's long been rumored as a casualty, as we wrote in May 2004 -

"All of this points to the Managed Code API project being offshored to somewhere closer to Siberia, and more modest lock-downs, such as No Execute pages (due to appear in XP Service Pack 2) being promoted as a good-enough answer."

Mary Jo reminds us that last summer Microsoft "decoupled" WinFS search and storage technology from Longhorn and out into a service pack, throwing in the sweetener for corporates reluctant to upgrade that the Avalon UI libraries would be available on XP. Now she wonders if the latest roadmap modification will be publicly acknowledged.

We think it will. Probably with a press release entitled "Longhorn Promises Greater Compatibility" with the task of imagining the additional words "than we originally planned" being left as an exercise for the reader. ®

Related decouplings

Avalon, WinFS decoupled for Windows Shorthorn
(Almost) everything may go, as Longhorn rushes to release
MS Trusted Computing back to drawing board
No Windows XP SE as Longhorn jettisons features
MS delays Yukon
Windows Shorthorn is dead-on-arrival
Even Microsoft can't wait for Longhorn
MS moves into get Longhorn on the road mode
Longhorn to erase Cairo mis-step with 1995 ship date
Windows Longhorn build leak starts hype two years early
Longhorn RTM what it means to you
Microsoft delays Longhorn. Again
Only kidding? MS may ship Longhorn server after all
Gates confirms Windows Longhorn for 2003, Blackcomb MIA?

Related stories

Indigo not so open as .NET Framework?
New Microsoft Longhorn chief is indigestion expert
Microsoft going to JavaOne

High performance access to file storage

More from The Register

next story
Obama allows NSA to exploit 0-days: report
If the spooks say they need it, they get it
Samsung Galaxy S5 fingerprint scanner hacked in just 4 DAYS
Sammy's newbie cooked slower than iPhone, also costs more to build
Putin tells Snowden: Russia conducts no US-style mass surveillance
Gov't is too broke for that, Russian prez says
Snowden-inspired crypto-email service Lavaboom launches
German service pays tribute to Lavabit
Mounties always get their man: Heartbleed 'hacker', 19, CUFFED
Canadian teen accused of raiding tax computers using OpenSSL bug
One year on: diplomatic fail as Chinese APT gangs get back to work
Mandiant says past 12 months shows Beijing won't call off its hackers
Call of Duty 'fragged using OpenSSL's Heartbleed exploit'
So it begins ... or maybe not, says one analyst
prev story

Whitepapers

Top three mobile application threats
Learn about three of the top mobile application security threats facing businesses today and recommendations on how to mitigate the risk.
Combat fraud and increase customer satisfaction
Based on their experience using HP ArcSight Enterprise Security Manager for IT security operations, Finansbank moved to HP ArcSight ESM for fraud management.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Five 3D headsets to be won!
We were so impressed by the Durovis Dive headset we’ve asked the company to give some away to Reg readers.
SANS - Survey on application security programs
In this whitepaper learn about the state of application security programs and practices of 488 surveyed respondents, and discover how mature and effective these programs are.