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IBM and Red Hat to teach Uni students how not to get offshored

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Jobs of tomorrow. Jobs of tomorrow. Jobs of tomorrow. That's what IBM and Red Hat can promise the software students of today who are seeing their potential jobs offshored to India.

IBM and Red Hat were emphatic about looking toward the future in a joint statement issued today to tout their promotion of Linux with university students. "To better prepare college students for the jobs of tomorrow, IBM and Red Hat are working together to collaborate with educators in teaching students the open source, standards-based skills necessary to compete for the information technology jobs of tomorrow." Point taken.

IBM and Red Hat have promised to bring Linux to the drunken, information-hungry masses by helping schools develop Linux skills and curricula. The companies plan to focus on software and server training.

If this feels familiar, that's because it is. IBM, Red Hat, Oracle, HP and numerous other companies have tried the "get them while they're young" approach to generating more interest in Linux many times. The hope is that a young, drug-addled Linux developer or user is a Linux developer or user for life. Forget that Microsoft stuff.

This time around, IBM and Red Hat insist that an early embrace of Linux will lead to high-paying jobs.

"There is an increasing demand for high-value, high-paying jobs that require skills in open standards technologies like Linux," said Gina Poole, vice president of developer relations and the IBM Academic Initiative at IBM. "We are pleased to be working with our long-time business partner, Red Hat, to help students develop the cutting-edge technology skills they need, especially in open source technology."

Hopefully, IBM and Red Hat will also hold some classes on how US developers will find jobs here after the two companies have sent the majority of their work to India, China and elsewhere. Funny though, nothing like that was mentioned beside jobs of tomorrow anywhere we looked.

There's more information on this Linux lovefest here. ®

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