Feeds

Navicore launches UK GPS kit for Symbian

Smart-phone navigation

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk

Finnish smart-phone route-planning software developer Navicore set up shop in the UK this week, pledging to shake up the consumer GPS market.

Its £200 offering, which includes navigation software and street-level UK maps on a 256MB memory card, along with a "highly sensitive" Bluetooth-enabled SiRF GPS receiver, goes on sale on 1 June.

Navicore's code runs right off the bundled memory card. Only 128MB are taken up with maps and software, so there's plenty of space to add extra maps covering other European countries - coming this summer on a separate, as yet unpriced CD-ROM, or on individual memory cards for £100 a pop - or other data. The GPS receiver provides up to 15 hours' usage on a single charge, Navicore said.

The software runs on Symbian OS-based smart phones, with Series 60 and Series 80 user-interface support straight away and UIQ versions - for handsets like the Sony Ericsson 910i and the Motorola A1000 - coming soon after. The Series 80 version costs £250.

Navicore UK chief William Morgan claimed the package was the "first quality in-car GPS navigator at a tenth of the price". We'd beg to differ. Navicore's solution is certainly a lot less expensive than some of the higher-end fixed-installation in-car units, but Medion's PocketPC-based bundle has been available for some years now, as have rival offerings from Navman, Garmin, Mio and others. These are a hundred pounds or so more expensive than Navicore, but they include a PDA in the package.

Rival route-planning software developer ALK launched a version of its CoPilot last September, though it only runs on Windows Mobile-based smart phones. ALK launched at £220, also with a bundled Bluetooth-enabled GPS receiver, and a 128MB memory card. T-Mobile is bundling the package with its SDA and MDA Compact devices.

Still, there are far more Symbian-based smart phones being used today than there are handsets running the Microsoft OS, and that puts Navicore in a strong position to build market share quickly. Across Western Europe, GPS has become a key purchase criterion for PDAs, and has kept the handheld market buoyant when it has slumped in other geographies.

Bringing that functionality to smart phones is a more recent move but one, given the number of handsets out there already and the number that will be bought over the coming years, that has a much further consumer reach than the PDA-based segment.

Navicore's bundle will initially be made available through network operator's O2's retail chain, but Morgan said the company was in talks with all the other networks and major mass-market retailers to expose the product to a broader customer base. ®

Related stories

Motorola smart phones to bundle navigation app
MS smart phones gain in-car nav kit

Related reviews

Garmin iQue M5 GPS PocketPC
Mio 268 GPS navigation system
Navman PiN GPS PocketPC
ALK CoPilot Smartphone

Security for virtualized datacentres

More from The Register

next story
TEEN RAMPAGE: Kids in iPhone 6 'Will it bend' YouTube 'prank'
iPhones bent in Norwich? As if the place wasn't weird enough
Consumers agree to give up first-born child for free Wi-Fi – survey
This Herod network's ace – but crap reception in bullrushes
Crouching tiger, FAST ASLEEP dragon: Smugglers can't shift iPhone 6s
China's grey market reports 'sluggish' sales of Apple mobe
Sea-Me-We 5 construction starts
New sub cable to go live 2016
New EU digi-commish struggles with concepts of net neutrality
Oettinger all about the infrastructure – but not big on substance
PEAK IPV4? Global IPv6 traffic is growing, DDoS dying, says Akamai
First time the cache network has seen drop in use of 32-bit-wide IP addresses
EE coughs to BROKEN data usage metrics BLUNDER that short-changes customers
Carrier apologises for 'inflated' measurements cockup
Comcast: Help, help, FCC. Netflix and pals are EXTORTIONISTS
The others guys are being mean so therefore ... monopoly all good, yeah?
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.