Feeds

IBM: we have simplified our software

Apparently

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Business security measures using SSL

Steve Mills, IBM's head of software, says the company has made "significant" inroads in simplifying installation and management for customers.

IBM has changed the way it develops and manages its diverse set of product code bases, having bought 42 software companies - each with differing code bases - during the last 10 years, he said. IBM now re-uses 50 million lines of code to eliminate redundancy and to provide greater consistency for customers across products.

Mills made the claims yesterday in response to Donna Scott, Gartner veep and analyst, during Gartner's Symposium and IT/xpo 2005. In a discussion titled "conquering complexity in software and networking", Scott said some Gartner clients are troubled by the complexity of IBM's software. Mills was joined during the debate by Charles Giancarlo, Cisco's chief technology officer.

Under questioning from Scott, Mills confessed: "We recognize, we are the impediment" to simplified IT.

He said that one problem is the need to balance innovation around new features, which some customers want - but which threaten to further complicate the underlying code base - with the desire to consolidate the existing feature set.

"It's part of our DNA and part of what we do as a company," He said. "This is an endless struggle of how do we get the balance between delivering features for leading edge customers and providing scalability for the mass market."

He also blamed developers' "culture" for helping complicate application development. "Given enough time and resource, software engineers will re-invent the work of everyone who's gone before them... with pride."

Mills advised ISVs and customers to contain development by restricting the amount of resources available to programmers and the time they have to complete projects. Standards and open source mean that developers can re-use code and take advantage of componentized software, avoiding the need to re-invent.

"Re-use is an enormous advantage in the reduction of complexity and improving usability," he said. ®

Related stories

IBM has moment of SOA clarity
IBM outfits blade servers with cheap middleware for the masses
IBM moves the database goalposts

New hybrid storage solutions

More from The Register

next story
'Windows 9' LEAK: Microsoft's playing catchup with Linux
Multiple desktops and live tiles in restored Start button star in new vids
Not appy with your Chromebook? Well now it can run Android apps
Google offers beta of tricky OS-inside-OS tech
New 'Cosmos' browser surfs the net by TXT alone
No data plan? No WiFi? No worries ... except sluggish download speed
iOS 8 release: WebGL now runs everywhere. Hurrah for 3D graphics!
HTML 5's pretty neat ... when your browser supports it
Greater dev access to iOS 8 will put us AT RISK from HACKERS
Knocking holes in Apple's walled garden could backfire, says securo-chap
NHS grows a NoSQL backbone and rips out its Oracle Spine
Open source? In the government? Ha ha! What, wait ...?
Google extends app refund window to two hours
You now have 120 minutes to finish that game instead of 15
Intel: Hey, enterprises, drop everything and DO HADOOP
Big Data analytics projected to run on more servers than any other app
SUSE Linux owner Attachmate gobbled by Micro Focus for $2.3bn
Merger will lead to mainframe and COBOL powerhouse
prev story

Whitepapers

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk
A single remote control platform for user support is be key to providing an efficient helpdesk. Retain full control over the way in which screen and keystroke data is transmitted.
WIN a very cool portable ZX Spectrum
Win a one-off portable Spectrum built by legendary hardware hacker Ben Heck
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Security and trust: The backbone of doing business over the internet
Explores the current state of website security and the contributions Symantec is making to help organizations protect critical data and build trust with customers.