Feeds

So, you want to be a computer scientist...

Brain Academy 2005 is go

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Intelligent flash storage arrays

It's that time of year again: BrainAcademy is back. This is the now-regular competition where A-level students and others compete for a fees-paid place at Queen Mary's University, London. However, the organisers have for the first time opened the competition to include post-graduates, and not just those from computer science backgrounds.

Dr. Paul Curzon, from the computer science department at Queen Mary's University says that the idea is to keep making the competition bigger and better each year, and that one of the main aims this year is to attract a more diverse field of entries.

Prizes this year include that place on an undergraduate computer science degree course at the College, starting in 2006 with all tuition fees paid; postgraduate degree bursaries; study abroad; and fast-track interviews for Microsoft's Student Internship and Graduate programme. For the postgraduate entrants, there are two places on Computer Science masters courses, one for computer science graduates, and one for those from other disciplines.

"The competition as a whole is about career opportunities," Curzon told El Reg. "It make sense to offer prizes to people whatever stage of their career they are at."

Curzon adds that he is keen to see applications from people with a background in psychology, or in performing arts: "Computer science is a wide subject, it is about more than just computers. It is about people and creativity, and about designing the technology of the future, and technology that will focus our society," he concludes.

As usual, the competition will start with a set of 12 questions which entrants can answer as many times as they like. Once this stage of the contest is successfully completed, the wannabe computer scientists can register for the programming challenge. The best of the bunch at this stage will proceed to final interviews.

Find out more here. ®

Related stories

UK unis flaunt new computer science courses
MIT and Quanta want to take seams out of computing
Business school 'hack' raises ethical questions

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk

More from The Register

next story
Preview redux: Microsoft ships new Windows 10 build with 7,000 changes
Latest bleeding-edge bits borrow Action Center from Windows Phone
Google opens Inbox – email for people too thick to handle email
Print this article out and give it to someone tech-y if you get stuck
Microsoft promises Windows 10 will mean two-factor auth for all
Sneak peek at security features Redmond's baking into new OS
FTDI yanks chip-bricking driver from Windows Update, vows to fight on
Next driver to battle fake chips with 'non-invasive' methods
UNIX greybeards threaten Debian fork over systemd plan
'Veteran Unix Admins' fear desktop emphasis is betraying open source
Entity Framework goes 'code first' as Microsoft pulls visual design tool
Visual Studio database diagramming's out the window
Google+ goes TITSUP. But WHO knew? How long? Anyone ... Hello ...
Wobbly Gmail, Contacts, Calendar on the other hand ...
prev story

Whitepapers

Why cloud backup?
Combining the latest advancements in disk-based backup with secure, integrated, cloud technologies offer organizations fast and assured recovery of their critical enterprise data.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
New hybrid storage solutions
Tackling data challenges through emerging hybrid storage solutions that enable optimum database performance whilst managing costs and increasingly large data stores.