Feeds

Sun acquires oldSCO for $25m

Tarantella travels to Santa Clara

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Mobile application security vulnerability report

Sun Microsystems has bought SCO - or at least the company that used to be SCO - for $25m.

Sun today announced its buy of Tarantella in a cash deal. Tarantella was once known as the Santa Cruz Operation (SCO) before that company sold its operating system assets to Caldera in 2001, kicking off a world of hurt for Linux fans everywhere.

Since that acquisition, Tarantella has focused on selling products that let customers tap into server-side applications via a secure desktop. Sun is looking for the deal to close in its first fiscal quarter of 2006, which ends this fall.

Sun will likely use Tarantella's software as a complement to its Sun Ray thin clients and internet infrastructure software packages. The Tarantella code works on a wide variety of systems, including Solaris for SPARC, Solaris x86, other flavors of Unix, Linux, IBM's mainframe OSes and Microsoft's Windows.

"I see this as an attempt to move ahead with Sun's ambitions around thin but rich clients," said James Governor, an analyst at RedMonk. "But this also offers some interesting interoperability opportunities with Microsoft code."

Of course, the deal also paves the way from some SCO gags too.

"It's good to see a home for the only good IP (intellectual property) left from the old Santa Cruz Operation," Governor added.

The buy of Tarantella's is the second significant software acquisition for Sun in as many days. It announced a deal yesterday to purchase storage software maker Procom for $50m. Both of the companies already had strong ties to Sun. ®

Related stories

Tarantella backs SuSE and Red Hat
Wanted: ISPs to flog StarOffice
Original Mac hand leads Sun desktop charge
Sun buys $50m worth of NAS software IP
Sun could quell database hunger with Unify buy

The Essential Guide to IT Transformation

More from The Register

next story
NO MORE ALL CAPS and other pleasures of Visual Studio 14
Unpicking a packed preview that breaks down ASP.NET
Cheer up, Nokia fans. It can start making mobes again in 18 months
The real winner of the Nokia sale is *drumroll* ... Nokia
Mozilla fixes CRITICAL security holes in Firefox, urges v31 upgrade
Misc memory hazards 'could be exploited' - and guess what, one's a Javascript vuln
Put down that Oracle database patch: It could cost $23,000 per CPU
On-by-default INMEMORY tech a boon for developers ... as long as they can afford it
Google shows off new Chrome OS look
Athena springs full-grown from Chromium project's head
Apple: We'll unleash OS X Yosemite beta on the MASSES on 24 July
Starting today, regular fanbois will be guinea pigs, it tells Reg
HIDDEN packet sniffer spy tech in MILLIONS of iPhones, iPads – expert
Don't panic though – Apple's backdoor is not wide open to all, guru tells us
prev story

Whitepapers

Designing a Defense for Mobile Applications
Learn about the various considerations for defending mobile applications - from the application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Top 8 considerations to enable and simplify mobility
In this whitepaper learn how to successfully add mobile capabilities simply and cost effectively.
Seven Steps to Software Security
Seven practical steps you can begin to take today to secure your applications and prevent the damages a successful cyber-attack can cause.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.