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Tyan debuts dual-core Opteron server mobo

Two sockets, four cores

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Taiwanese vendor Tyan today introduced its latest two-way AMD Opteron-based server mobo: the Thunder K8SE (S2892).

The Thunder K8SE supports current Opteron 2xx series processors, and is ready for dual-core versions when they ship later this quarter, Tyan said.

The CPUs are backed by Nvidia's nForce Pro 2200 chipset, which provides twin PCI Express x16 slots (one with x16 signalling, the other with x4 signalling), 3GBps Serial ATA 2 with RAID for connecting up to four drives.

An AMD 8130 PCI-X chipset hooks in the board's three PCI-X slots, while a Broadcom BCM5704C controller handles the mobo's twin twin Gigabit Ethernet ports. The board also sports a third, 10/100Mbps Ethernet port, controlled by an Intel 82551QM chip, and a pair of USB 2.0 connectors.

Graphics comes courtesy of an ATI Rage XL PCI graphics controller with 8MB of video RAM.

Tyan said the Thunder K8SE (S2892) is currently shipping in volume to all customers the world over. ®

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