Feeds

GSM Association rejects revised phone DRM rates

'Think again, MPEG Licensing Authority'

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Internet Security Threat Report 2014

Revised DRM licensing terms offered by the MPEG Licensing Authority (LA) remain "unacceptable", the mobile phone networks' club said yesterday.

The GSM Association, which represents more than 660 networks which handle more than a billion mobile phone users worldwide - said it had "met with dismay" the revised royalty regime.

In January, the MPEG LA suggested to the Open Mobile Alliance (OMA), which maintains technology standards in the mobile phone world, a $1 per handset and one per cent of the cost of each transaction royalty for the use of DRM technology patents it administers on behalf of ContentGuard, Intertrust, Matsushita, Philips, Sony and others.

Last month, however, the GSMA went public with its view that such a model was unworkable, calling the scheme "impractical, excessive and short-sighted". In short, network operators believe it's too darn expensive.

In response, the MPEG-LA suggested an alternative: pay 65c for each DRM-enabled handset and cap the per-user royalty at 25c a year. Since most DRM-protected downloads are likely to cost several dollars a pop, each user needs only make one to two downloads a year to hit the limit. Given the success of Apple's iTunes, punters are likely to download rather more than two items a year.

The GSMA still thinks the cost is too high, and warned that, unless prices are cut, MPEG-LA risks operators dashing off and acquiring a range of different DRM systems, making the phone content download market as fragmented and as broadly incompatible as are digital music downloads.

<pIt wants an "open... content market [to] drive the flow of rich multimedia content across the mobile world", as Frank Boulben, executive VP for brand and consumer marketing at Orange, put it, in a statement. ®

Related stories

Dutch plans for iPod tax could kill MP3 industry
A Yahoo! phone? Nokia can help
MPEG LA cuts mobile phone DRM tax
Phone DRM too expensive, say carriers
DRM comes to mobiles
Mobile DRM levy hits operators where it hurts
Phone biz agrees on $1 DRM levy

Intelligent flash storage arrays

More from The Register

next story
You! AT&T! The only thing 'unlimited' about you is your CHEEK, growl feds
Man, we did everything but knock on their doors - carrier
The DRUGSTORES DON'T WORK, CVS makes IT WORSE ... for Apple Pay
Goog Wallet apparently also spurned in NFC lockdown
Watch out, Samsung and Apple: Xiaomi's No 3 in smartphones now
From obscurity to selling 19 million mobes a quarter
Brazil greenlights $200m internet cable to Europe in bid to outfox NSA
Only one problem: it won't make the slightest difference. And they know it
Wanna hop carriers with your iPad's Apple SIM? AVOID AT&T
Unless you want your network-swapping tech disabled for good, that is
Knocking Knox: Samsung DENIES vuln claims, says mysterious blogger is a JOKER
But YES, system does store encryption key on the device
prev story

Whitepapers

Why and how to choose the right cloud vendor
The benefits of cloud-based storage in your processes. Eliminate onsite, disk-based backup and archiving in favor of cloud-based data protection.
Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Saudi Petroleum chooses Tegile storage solution
A storage solution that addresses company growth and performance for business-critical applications of caseware archive and search along with other key operational systems.
Protecting users from Firesheep and other Sidejacking attacks with SSL
Discussing the vulnerabilities inherent in Wi-Fi networks, and how using TLS/SSL for your entire site will assure security.