Feeds

MontaVista Linux phones heading for US and Europe

From server to handsets - the struggle continues

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Protecting against web application threats using SSL

The first mobile handsets running MontaVista’s Linux operating system should hit the US and Europe within the next year, the embedded OS vendor said this week.

MontaVista launched the first tailor-made version of its operating system for handsets on Wednesday and said it is working with providers in Asian markets and that these companies now expect to bring products to the US and Europe.

MontaVista would not provide further details, although its embedded Linux is currently licensed to at least three handset manufactures – Motorola, NEC and Panasonic in Asia.

MontaVista is touting Linux’s familiar advantages of cost of ownership; however, the company seems to have picked a tough battle.

ABI Research said last year it expects Microsoft to sew-up the wireless handset market by 2009, relegating Symbian to less than 50 per cent market share. IDC also expects Symbian to lose ground to Microsoft during the next two years, although it will stay above 50 per cent.

According to MontaVista, handset manufacturers serving Asia prefer Linux because it enables them to use a single operating system on different devices, from high-end smart phones to mass-market voice-only phones.

An added advantage is that handset manufacturers and carriers can avoid becoming locked-into Microsoft’s technology roadmap. Vendors also have greater freedom to customize the software on devices and differentiate their services than if they’d used Windows, according to MontaVista.

“There is concern over putting too much control in the hands of a proprietary operating system vendor who will have control over them,” MontaVista product manager for wireless and mobile Jacob Lehrbaum said.

With 2.5m mobile devices running its software in Asian markets, MontaVista claims it is out-shipping both Microsoft and Symbian in the region.

MontaVista is now launching Mobilinux 4.0, its first version of the general purpose MontaVista Linux customized for small footprint devices. Improvements include better power management and performance with half-second start-times and the ability to make calls within 10 seconds of turning-on the device. Mobilinux 4.0 can run on devices running 12Mb of flash or less, the company said.®

Related stories

Montavista claims real time support for Linux mobile
Linux mobile phones get v7 suite boost from OpenWave
Wide Open News Embedded Linux looking lively

New hybrid storage solutions

More from The Register

next story
New 'Cosmos' browser surfs the net by TXT alone
No data plan? No WiFi? No worries ... except sluggish download speed
'Windows 9' LEAK: Microsoft's playing catchup with Linux
Multiple desktops and live tiles in restored Start button star in new vids
iOS 8 release: WebGL now runs everywhere. Hurrah for 3D graphics!
HTML 5's pretty neat ... when your browser supports it
'People have forgotten just how late the first iPhone arrived ...'
Plus: 'Google's IDEALISM is an injudicious justification for inappropriate biz practices'
Mathematica hits the Web
Wolfram embraces the cloud, promies private cloud cut of its number-cruncher
Mozilla shutters Labs, tells nobody it's been dead for five months
Staffer's blog reveals all as projects languish on GitHub
SUSE Linux owner Attachmate gobbled by Micro Focus for $2.3bn
Merger will lead to mainframe and COBOL powerhouse
iOS 8 Healthkit gets a bug SO Apple KILLS it. That's real healthcare!
Not fit for purpose on day of launch, says Cupertino
prev story

Whitepapers

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.
WIN a very cool portable ZX Spectrum
Win a one-off portable Spectrum built by legendary hardware hacker Ben Heck
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.