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BT is teaming up with Sportfive to stream video footage of the remaining World Cup qualifiers over the internet.

Games which are not televised will be streamed instead. Users can choose a 250k or 500k stream for €9.95. Or you can download the game to keep for €6.95.

Sportfive is a sports rights agency which claims to own the rights for the largest selection of European qualifying games. It is owned by RTL Group, Advent International and Goldman Sachs. The games will be available at www.qualifiers2006.com and promoted on affiliate sites.

BT is also streaming the final of the Scottish Rugby premiership live from Murrayfield on Saturday.

David Parry-Jones, sales director for BT Rich Media, told the Reg: "Sportfive owns about 70 per cent of the rights for European Football Associations. For areas where the games are not being broadcast they have the right to show games online. We are concentrating on ex-pat communities such as Europeans living in the US." ®

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