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VIA uploads graphics core driver source code

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VIA has posted open source drivers for its graphics chipsets, part of its project to encourage the use of Linux with its EPIA embedded x86 platform.

The chipset maker said it had made driver code available for S3 Graphics' UniChrome family of graphics cores integrated into its CLE266, CN400, PM800 and PM880 North Bridge components. The drivers support Linux kernel 2.6.x.

VIA has also posted driver source code for S3's ProSavage and ProSavage DDR integrated graphics controllers, it said. The latter are found in VIA's KM/KN/PM/P4M/P4N266, VT8372, VT8375, VT8613, VT8703A and VT8751 chipsets. The following chipsets integrate the regular ProSavage: PL133/T, KL133/A, KM133/A series, VT8361/4, VT8364A, VT8365, VT8365A and VT8604. Driver support extends to Linux 2.4.x kernels and up.

The source code release includes drivers for the Ethernet controllers built into VIA's VT6107, VT8231, VT8233/A/C, VT8235 and VT8237 South Bridge chips. The network drivers support Linux kernels 2.4.x and 2.6.x.

The drivers are available for download at viaarena.com. ®

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