Feeds

IBM hands over NAS duties to NetApp in mega storage tie-up

It's an EMC hate thang

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Protecting against web application threats using SSL

If you're EMC, the last couple of hours haven't been terribly pleasant. That's because two of EMC's rivals - IBM and Network Appliance - announced a major alliance designed to crimp EMC's style in the network attached storage (NAS) market.

IBM will now start reselling NetApp's entire line of NAS gear and related software. The products will ship with an IBM sticker and have a couple tweaks here and there, but they'll all be pure NetApp underneath the bezel. In return, NetApp will promote IBM "as its preferred supplier of tape" products and will make sure IBM's Tivoli storage management software works great with NetApp's hardware.

The vendors' weren't terribly coy about what they hope to accomplish with this arrangement. Their joint press release announcing the deal was entitled: "IBM AND NETWORK APPLIANCE TEAM TO TAKE ON EMC."

NetApp has to be seen as a big winner here. It gets one of the world's largest sales channels via such a massive partner. It has one less competitor to worry about and more muscle to go up against rival EMC. NetApp isn't always the most aggressive company, so having the fierce sales arm of IBM on its side will help too.

IBM, on the other hand, could use a serious NAS boost. Its networked storage revenue dropped 18 per cent in the fourth quarter, according to IDC, which marked part of a larger, overall decline in storage sales.

In addition, IBM has had trouble making up its mind in the NAS space - a market dominated by EMC and NetApp. In the past, it sold a hulking NAS 500 Gateway system aimed only at large customers. Then, last year, IBM decided the low-end NAS market was worth its effort and began selling a cheaper single processor version of the NAS 500. Since that move, IBM has hardly uttered a peep about its NAS gear.

As a result of the new deal, IBM is currently debating whether or not to keep selling the NAS 500 system. The same goes for its iSCSI SAN products. The companies expect the new IBM-branded gear to arrive in the channel by the third quarter.

All of this has to be seen as good news for IBM's customers who can now purchase top NAS gear straight from Big Blue. IBM has placed much more attention on its Fibre Channel SAN hardware, leaving its NAS line and associated market share to languish. NetApp didn't really need any help selling systems, but having the IBM channel at its feet is pretty nice. ®

Related stories

IDC's storage winners and losers
Business goes mad for storage
EMC preps iSCSI binge
IBM's storage software owns all of EMC kit

Choosing a cloud hosting partner with confidence

More from The Register

next story
Wanna keep your data for 1,000 YEARS? No? Hard luck, HDS wants you to anyway
Combine Blu-ray and M-DISC and you get this monster
Google+ GOING, GOING ... ? Newbie Gmailers no longer forced into mandatory ID slurp
Mountain View distances itself from lame 'network thingy'
US boffins demo 'twisted radio' mux
OAM takes wireless signals to 32 Gbps
Apple flops out 2FA for iCloud in bid to stop future nude selfie leaks
Millions of 4chan users howl with laughter as Cupertino slams stable door
'Kim Kardashian snaps naked selfies with a BLACKBERRY'. *Twitterati gasps*
More alleged private, nude celeb pics appear online
Students playing with impressive racks? Yes, it's cluster comp time
The most comprehensive coverage the world has ever seen. Ever
Run little spreadsheet, run! IBM's Watson is coming to gobble you up
Big Blue's big super's big appetite for big data in big clouds for big analytics
Seagate's triple-headed Cerberus could SAVE the DISK WORLD
... and possibly bring us even more HAMR time. Yay!
prev story

Whitepapers

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.
WIN a very cool portable ZX Spectrum
Win a one-off portable Spectrum built by legendary hardware hacker Ben Heck
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.