Feeds

Microsoft and EC row deepens

It's handbags at dawn...

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

The smart choice: opportunity from uncertainty

The European Commission is investigating claims that Microsoft has deliberately sabotaged the video-player free version of Windows it is forced to sell in Europe.

Under the anti-trust settlement agreed last year Microsoft said it would ship a version of Windows without its Media Player. This version had to be "fully functioning" but without Media Player. But the EC is investigating complaints that this video-free version does not work properly.

A spokesman for the EC told AP that tests were still going on. The allegations centre on how the stripped down software works with other software and how media is played from within other applications like Word. So far the software has been sent to computer manufacturers but isn't being sold because the EC and Microsoft cannot agree on a name. Microsoft's proposal of "Windows XP Reduced Media Edition" was rejected by the Commission as likely to have a negative impact on sales.

The two have also fallen out over the role of a trustee to oversee Microsoft's compliance with the Commission's punishments.

The EC told Microsoft yesterday that its proposals for the role of the trustee were unacceptable. The software giant has until 11 April to respond to regulators. Under the agreement reached last year Microsoft was to appoint an independent monitor to check it was complying with the EC demands. But Microsoft wanted to limit the areas the monitor could look at.

The Commission said this proposal was "unacceptable". The EC said MS has ten days to agree with the compliance procedure or risk formal action from the Commission.

Microsoft says the Commission is inconsistent in what is asking for. A spokesman told the FT that it is frustrated by the EC's slow response to its proposals.

Microsoft also said yesterday that Dina Dublon, previously CFO at JPMorgan Chase, is joining the company's board of directors.®

Related stories

$5m daily fine beckons for bad boy Microsoft
EC raps MS over interoperability - again
EC checks MS compliance
MS out of the bundling business?

Designing a Defense for Mobile Applications

More from The Register

next story
HIDDEN packet sniffer spy tech in MILLIONS of iPhones, iPads – expert
Don't panic though – Apple's backdoor is not wide open to all, guru tells us
Do YOU work at Microsoft? Um. Are you SURE about that?
Nokia and marketing types first to get the bullet, says report
Microsoft takes on Chromebook with low-cost Windows laptops
Redmond's chief salesman: We're taking 'hard' decisions
Cheer up, Nokia fans. It can start making mobes again in 18 months
The real winner of the Nokia sale is *drumroll* ... Nokia
EU dons gloves, pokes Google's deals with Android mobe makers
El Reg cops a squint at investigatory letters
Chrome browser has been DRAINING PC batteries for YEARS
Google is only now fixing ancient, energy-sapping bug
Big Blue Apple: IBM to sell iPads, iPhones to enterprises
iOS/2 gear loaded with apps for big biz ... uh oh BlackBerry
prev story

Whitepapers

Seven Steps to Software Security
Seven practical steps you can begin to take today to secure your applications and prevent the damages a successful cyber-attack can cause.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
Designing a Defense for Mobile Applications
Learn about the various considerations for defending mobile applications - from the application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies.
Build a business case: developing custom apps
Learn how to maximize the value of custom applications by accelerating and simplifying their development.
Consolidation: the foundation for IT and business transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.