Feeds

Vonage expands UK service

But gets into hot water with the state of Texas

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Business security measures using SSL

Voice over Internet Protocol(VoIP) provider Vonage is expanding services to 100 cities in the UK, including Leeds, Milton Keynes, Oxford, Preston and Salisbury.

Residential customers pay £9.99 a month for unlimited calls to UK and Ireland fixed lines. Small business customers can pay £18.99 a month for unlimited calls to fixed lines in the UK and Ireland, plus a fax line with 500 local and national minutes.

Vonage claims 550,000 customers in the US and aims for the same number in the UK within a year.

Meanwhile in the US Vonage has fallen foul of regulators in Texas. There was a big kerfuffle when VoIP services first launched as to whether they should be regulated like traditional telcos. Such regulations typically include guarantees of service levels, guaranteed access to emergency numbers and requirements for broad network coverage so people living in rural areas were not discriminated against.

The state of Minnesota took action against Vonage back in 2003 to force it to follow traditional telco regulations. The Federal Communications Commission ruled that individual states cannot regulate VoIP providers.

But Texas ain't so sure. Texas Attorney General Greg Abbott is taking action against Vonage accusing them of deceptive marketing practises. Abbott says the firm did not make it clear to customers that they would not be able to make emergency 911 calls.

Customers in the UK should not have such problems because all Vonage services here include access to emergency numbers.

Vonage counters that US customers are told at least twice that they will not be able to make emergency calls unless they activate the service. More details on Infoworld here.®

Related stories

UK Wi-Fi hotspot users offered free Skype calls
FCC investigates VoIP squashers
Hands off VoIP, Feds tell states

Security and trust: The backbone of doing business over the internet

More from The Register

next story
Brit telcos warn Scots that voting Yes could lead to HEFTY bills
BT and Co: Independence vote likely to mean 'increased costs'
Phones 4u slips into administration after EE cuts ties with Brit mobe retailer
More than 5,500 jobs could be axed if rescue mission fails
New 'Cosmos' browser surfs the net by TXT alone
No data plan? No WiFi? No worries ... except sluggish download speed
Radio hams can encrypt, in emergencies, says Ofcom
Consultation promises new spectrum and hints at relaxed licence conditions
Google+ GOING, GOING ... ? Newbie Gmailers no longer forced into mandatory ID slurp
Mountain View distances itself from lame 'network thingy'
ISPs' post-net-neutrality world is built on 'bribes' says Tim Berners-Lee
Father of the worldwide web is extremely peeved over pay-per-packet-type plans
Vodafone to buy 140 Phones 4u stores from stricken retailer
887 jobs 'preserved' in the process, says administrator PwC
Bonking with Apple has POUNDED mobe operators' wallets
... into submission. Weve squeals, ditches payment plans
Drag queens: Oh, don't be so bitchy, Facebook! Let us use our stage names
Handbags at dawn over free content ad network's ID policy
prev story

Whitepapers

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.
WIN a very cool portable ZX Spectrum
Win a one-off portable Spectrum built by legendary hardware hacker Ben Heck
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.