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Intel to cut chipset prices 3 April - report

Just as next-gen Pentium system logic ships

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Intel will cut the prices of its 'Grantsdale' and 'Alderwood' chipsets next month, with further cuts coming in July, Taiwanese mobo maker sources have claimed by way of DigiTimes.

The first round of cuts, said to be coming on 3 April, will see the price of the 910GL, 915PL, 915GL, 915P, 915GV and 915G fall by up to $2. Come 3 July and the prices of the 910GL, 915PL, 915GL and 915P will fall a further $1, the site claims.

The first of the two dates marks the debut of Intel's next-generation Pentium chipsets, the 945P, 945G and 955X, said to ship for $38, $42 and $50, respectively. It is claimed the 945-series chipsets' prices will fall to $36 and $41 on 3 July.

The new chipsets will feature support for twin PCI Express x16 graphics cards, 667MHz DDR 2 SDRAM, 3Gbps Serial ATA 2 with enhanced RAID, and an updated graphics core, the GMA 950. The arrival of the 945 and 955 chipsets will alleviate the chipset supply problems mobo makers claim to have been suffering throughout Q1. ®

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