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Amputee seeks damages

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A Thai man who had his right leg and five toes on this left foot amputated after his mobile phone exploded is suing Nokia for Bt1m (£13,650) in damages.

Prasit Sriseeluang, 50 - who had his handset tucked in his shirt pocket at the time of the accident - was working near a high-voltage power pole when his phone rang. The handset then exploded, causing serious injuries to the welder.

Public prosecutors are suing Nokia Thailand for damages, claiming that the phone had defective parts, reports Thai newspaper The Nation.

Nokia Thailand has denied that the handset was faulty.

The Finnish mobile phone giant has been plagued by a string of reports of exploding handsets but is adamant that each of the cases was down to counterfeit batteries.

In December Nokia began applying a holographic sticker to its mobile phone batteries to prevent fake power packs being inadvertently purchased as the real thing.

A senior exec said the authentication programme "directly attack[ed] the counterfeiters who manufacture potentially unsafe batteries". ®

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