Feeds

Bloggers invade Austin music fest

Torrential torrents

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup

The South by Southwest (SXSW) music festival in Austin has always had a technology bent to it. Intermingled with the voluminous quantity of music and movies were speeches from leading IT pundits, open source gurus and the like. Sadly, this tech bent has turned to a blogger hell with the globs set to consume an inordinate amount of airtime - and air - at next week's show.

Does Robert Scoble really work at Microsoft? One has to wonder after seeing his name appear on the SXSW speaker list. Scoble seems to scoot around the country - by Segway most likely - annoying all kinds of audiences with his "revelations" about blogging. Shouldn't someone be required to write something interesting before being asked to talk about writing interesting things?

Or maybe you prefer, the Wonkette, Sean Bonner, Jason Calacanis, Henry Copeland, Jason Goldman, Jon Lebkowsky, Cameron Marlow or Tony Pierce. Surely one blogger is plenty to describe the idea of an online journal. It's not hard to imagine the SXSW organizers looking back on this year's lineup with shame.

On a more positive note, the tech savvy part of the SXSW crowd has organized a massive music dump. You can download 750 of the songs that will be performed at the show courtesy of a 2.6GB BitTorrent file.

SXSW attendees will be able to download all of the songs from the "Showcasing Artist" catalog - mostly tunes from up and coming or unsigned artists. In addition, they can pull down a complete schedule of the show onto their iPods and search by artist name, showcase data, club name or genre. Both the music and schedule downloads are being delivered by CitzenPod.

For those who haven't heard of SXSW, there's a handy introduction page here. More impressive, however, is a sample of the music lineup. Here's one day's worth of tunes. And so you understand Austin's title as Live Music Capital of the World. [No -ed.]

There's also a full list of speakers here. Most notably, Bram Cohen - the inventor of BitTorrent - will be speaking at the festival. Do your worst, hippies. ®

Related stories

Oz investigators bust 'file-sharing' ISP
BitTorrent gets major revamp
Leaked Doctor Who episode available for download
Loki puts donations toward $1m MPAA payoff

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup

More from The Register

next story
BBC: We're going to slip CODING into kids' TV
Pureed-carrot-in-ice cream C++ surprise
6 Obvious Reasons Why Facebook Will Ban This Article (Thank God)
Clampdown on clickbait ... and El Reg is OK with this
Twitter: La la la, we have not heard of any NUDE JLaw, Upton SELFIES
If there are any on our site it is not our fault as we are not a PUBLISHER
Facebook, Google and Instagram 'worse than drugs' says Miley Cyrus
Italian boffins agree with popette's theory that haters are the real wrecking balls
Sit tight, fanbois. Apple's '$400' wearable release slips into early 2015
Sources: time to put in plenty of clock-watching for' iWatch
Facebook to let stalkers unearth buried posts with mobe search
Prepare to HAUNT your pal's back catalogue
Ex-IBM CEO John Akers dies at 79
An era disrupted by the advent of the PC
prev story

Whitepapers

Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Endpoint data privacy in the cloud is easier than you think
Innovations in encryption and storage resolve issues of data privacy and key requirements for companies to look for in a solution.
Why cloud backup?
Combining the latest advancements in disk-based backup with secure, integrated, cloud technologies offer organizations fast and assured recovery of their critical enterprise data.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?