Feeds

Lucent is ready to manage your storage - true

With EMC's help

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Protecting against web application threats using SSL

There will soon be a new and unlikely storage company in town - Lucent.

The networking company has confirmed that it has a hosted storage service pilot program underway. Lucent has set up a data center in tandem with EMC that provides storage systems and networking gear to customers. The pilot could go live as an actual service within two months.

"That's one of the many different hosted services opportunities that the business is looking to put together," said Lucent spokesman Rich Teplitsky. "This type of SAN (storage area network) service is something we have worked on for awhile."

Lucent first revealed word of this storage service at CeBIT where an IDG News Service reporter caught wind of the plan. At this time, Lucent is reluctant to provide much more detail other than to say EMC will supply the storage gear, and it will supply some optical networking hardware. Customers will basically tap into a Lucent-run SAN and have Lucent manage their applications.

"It's generic storage," John Meyer, president of Lucent's worldwide services division told IDG. "We are linking the customer's applications to the storage center and back. Our intention is to take this and expand it to multiple clients."

Lucent already provides managed services in the areas of VoIP, networking and security, Teplitsky said.

Storage would seem to be a weird extension for Lucent in some ways. The market for managed storage is already quite full and companies such as Sun Microsystems and IBM - with more direct ties to storage kit - have made hosted storage a priority of late.

Lucent's networking expertise, however, could come in handy as storage systems, servers and switches start to blend together. The company is also in need of new business, due to the painfully shrinking telco equipment market.

For a funny managed services blast from the past, check out how Lucent, Sun, IBM and EMC were going to address the $133bn CyberCarrier market back in 2000. ®

Related stories

HP and SBC pledge to service you together
Unions back Lucent pay deal
Ex-Lucent boss could face bribe charges

Choosing a cloud hosting partner with confidence

More from The Register

next story
Wanna keep your data for 1,000 YEARS? No? Hard luck, HDS wants you to anyway
Combine Blu-ray and M-DISC and you get this monster
US boffins demo 'twisted radio' mux
OAM takes wireless signals to 32 Gbps
'Kim Kardashian snaps naked selfies with a BLACKBERRY'. *Twitterati gasps*
More alleged private, nude celeb pics appear online
Google+ GOING, GOING ... ? Newbie Gmailers no longer forced into mandatory ID slurp
Mountain View distances itself from lame 'network thingy'
Apple flops out 2FA for iCloud in bid to stop future nude selfie leaks
Millions of 4chan users howl with laughter as Cupertino slams stable door
Students playing with impressive racks? Yes, it's cluster comp time
The most comprehensive coverage the world has ever seen. Ever
Run little spreadsheet, run! IBM's Watson is coming to gobble you up
Big Blue's big super's big appetite for big data in big clouds for big analytics
Seagate's triple-headed Cerberus could SAVE the DISK WORLD
... and possibly bring us even more HAMR time. Yay!
prev story

Whitepapers

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.
WIN a very cool portable ZX Spectrum
Win a one-off portable Spectrum built by legendary hardware hacker Ben Heck
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.