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Single Sign On 'in-a-box' lands in Europe

Imprivata aims to turn on resellers with appliance play

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Single sign on appliance firm Imprivata launched in the Europe on Monday (7 March) with a promise to reduce corporate password management pains.

Imprivata's OneSign appliances are designed to authenticate users so that they only have to log on once in order to access multiple applications (either desktop, client-server or Web-based). This single sign on approach reduces password headaches - which Imprivata reckons account for 30 per cent of help desk calls - because users don't have to remember multiple passwords.

Single Sign On (SSO) has been around for some time but Imprivata says that its appliance approach means that users can dispense with the custom scripting approach needed with rival software packages. Instead OneSign users would use its Application Profile Generator to provision access. For additional security, OneSign also offers built-in support for strong authentication methods such as ID tokens and finger biometrics. OneSign ships in redundant pairs ensuring failover.

Imprivata execs said the firm is targeting mid-market companies in competition with more established security vendors such as CA, Novell and RSA Security. Last month RSA launched its first appliance, the RSA SecurID Appliance, with the aim of making it easier for smaller firms to deploy its two-factor authentication technology for applications such as remote access. Bill McQuaide, RSA Security's SVP, said that RSA's roadmap covered plans to develop a wider range of appliances covering functions such as Single Sign On as well authentication.

Imprivata reckons it’s the first company to release an SSO appliance. Having launched products in the US in April 2004, it is expanding into Europe by setting up shop in the UK and beginning a programme to recruit partners in the region. EMEA resellers signed up so far include: Enline, UK; First Attribute, Germany; Q&I, Netherlands; Exoservice, Italy and SmartSoft, Israel. Privately held Imprivata was established in 2000 and backed by venture funding from Polaris Venture Partners, Highland Capital Partners and General Catalyst Partners.

The Imprivata OneSign Single Sign-On appliance is available immediately, with prices from £11,700 in the UK (€15,999) for a one-unit rack unit with a redundant appliance included. ®

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