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Centerprise buys disaster recover firm

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Centerprise International, the UK PC builder, has acquired disaster recovery specialist Adam Continuity for an undisclosed seven-figure amount. The deal, announced today, enables Centerprise to add specialist disaster recovery services to its portfolio and gives it access to Adam Continuity's customesr, which includes many blue chip organisations. It also creates an opportunity for Centerprise to sell additional services to its public sector customer base.

Adam Continuity employs 15 people in Greenford, Middlesex and Newbury, Berkshire and works exclusively with desktop and servers. Its services kick in when a customer's building become unusable or it had a major IT systems failure.

Adam Continuity can replicate an office elsewhere with access to backup servers and PCs loaded with the same image that workers generally use within 24 hours and typically within 4 hours. Adam Continuity provides IBM's recovery service and this is expected to continue post-acquisition. ®


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