Feeds

Loki puts donations toward $1m MPAA payoff

How the feeble have fallen

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

High performance access to file storage

Opinion Give the MPAA (Motion Picture Association of America) credit for a huge win against P2P file-trading technology. A recent settlement has exposed the scaly underbelly of some P2P site operators. In particular, the MPAA has outed Edward Webber - the owner of BitTorrent hub LokiTorrent.

When the MPAA filed a round of lawsuits at BitTorrent sites, LokiTorrent stood up as a proud defender of P2P technology. It promised to battle the MPAA to the death in court and asked for financial aid from file-traders to make this legal fight possible. Loyal traders tossed more than $40,000 to Edward Webber's crew, hoping to give P2P technology another day in court.

Do BitTorrent hubs that merely point the way to copyrighted files actually violate copyrights? Aren't they just maps? Aren't they legal?

The courts won't have a crack at answering these questions because LokiTorrent gave in to the major movie studious. The ever-vigilant Jon Newton at P2Pnet discovered this week that Webber agreed to pay $1m to the MPAA, to never run a suspect BitTorrent hub again and to turn over all the data sitting on his servers.

The comic or tragic part of this situation is Webber's apparent defense of these actions posted on another site owned by him called MuffTorrent.

"Muff Torrent has lost the fight for your rights to freely share on the internet," the site says. "All donations to this point have been spent on legal fees. Any future donations will be spent paying off remaining bills."

It's easy to argue the use of 'fight' in that statement. Weber settled out of court. If you donated money to LokiTorrent, it was apparently used to craft document 3:04-CV-2642-N available in PDF format from P2Pnet here. If you traded on LokiTorrent, Muff Torrent or any other Webber owned site, you paid a lawyer to turn over your identity and evidence of your file-trading to the MPAA.

"NO donation money to date (legal or otherwise) has been spent on personal expenses (for those who were recently wondering)," the web site message continues.

So Weber didn't buy a cheeseburger with your $40,000, but he may have bought his legal staff a nice lunch spread. Fight? Hardly.

"Thank you for your undying support over the past year. We will miss having you here as much as you will miss being here."

Touching stuff.

The settlement bars Webber from running any P2P sites that may violate any MPAA copyrights. He, however, has vowed to keep making "fun and useful" sites.

To be fair, we would have caved under the demands of a $1m settlement too, but we wouldn't have promised to fight until the end with other peoples' money in the first place.

Read more on the matter here. ®

Related stories

Sue the reader of this File Sharing Book
Cryptographers to Hollywood: prepare to fail on DRM
MPAA closes Loki
'Brave' BitTorrent hub coyly looks for suitors

High performance access to file storage

More from The Register

next story
Audio fans, prepare yourself for the Second Coming ... of Blu-ray
High Fidelity Pure Audio – is this what your ears have been waiting for?
Dropbox defends fantastically badly timed Condoleezza Rice appointment
'Nothing is going to change with Dr. Rice's appointment,' file sharer promises
Nokia offers 'voluntary retirement' to 6,000+ Indian employees
India's 'predictability and stability' cited as mobe-maker's tax payment deadline nears
Apple DOMINATES the Valley, rakes in more profit than Google, HP, Intel, Cisco COMBINED
Cook & Co. also pay more taxes than those four worthies PLUS eBay and Oracle
It may be ILLEGAL to run Heartbleed health checks – IT lawyer
Do the right thing, earn up to 10 years in clink
France bans managers from contacting workers outside business hours
«Email? Mais non ... il est plus tard que six heures du soir!»
Adrian Mole author Sue Townsend dies at 68
RIP Blighty's best-selling author of the 1980s
Zucker punched: Google gobbles Facebook-wooed Titan Aerospace
Up, up and away in my beautiful balloon flying broadband-bot
Analysts: Bright future for smartphones, tablets, wearables
There's plenty of good money to be made if you stay out of the PC market
prev story

Whitepapers

Mainstay ROI - Does application security pay?
In this whitepaper learn how you and your enterprise might benefit from better software security.
Five 3D headsets to be won!
We were so impressed by the Durovis Dive headset we’ve asked the company to give some away to Reg readers.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Mobile application security study
Download this report to see the alarming realities regarding the sheer number of applications vulnerable to attack, as well as the most common and easily addressable vulnerability errors.