Feeds

TUC to IT workers: 'You're working too hard'

Relax a little

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Choosing a cloud hosting partner with confidence

IT workers put in more unpaid overtime than almost any other profession, according to the TUC (Trades Union Congress). The organisation is calling on managers to recognise the extra time their staff puts in, and has declared Friday 25 February "Work your proper hours day".

IT managers work an average of nine hours and 12 minutes per week on top of their official, contracted hours, a new league table reveals. The TUC calculated that if managers did all this unpaid overtime at the start of the year, they wouldn't start to be paid until 8 March. If they were paid for the extra hours, their salaries would increase by more than £10,000.

IT workers don't fare much better, clocking up an average of six hours and six minutes unpaid overtime each week, making 17 February their first paid working day. (Our congratualtions to all of you who started getting paid last week.) All these donated hours are worth more than £5,000 to their employers.

Tech companies also have the greatest proportion of staff working overtime for free. An average of 40 per cent of the workforce, including staff from all departments, puts in extra hours.

The news should come as some consolation to managers worried that IT staff spend too much time sending personal emails.

Brendan Barber, TUC general secretary, argues that many companies would collapse without the extra time put in by staff. Although most people are happy to put in the time when it is needed, in emergencies, or in the run up to a deadline, it can easily get taken for granted, and be built into the expected working week, he warned.

"Work Your Proper Hours Day is a once a year opportunity for bosses to say thank you to their staff for their extra work, and for employees to remind themselves just how much extra time they would have if they did go home on time every day," he said.

Tech staff are not alone in their dedication to duty: teachers work more than 11 hours unpaid overtime each week, and those in public service roles, like the armed forces, fire brigade or ambulance staff, put almost ten extra hours each week. ®

Related stories

BT workers demand 8% pay rise
UK techies blow 17 days a year yakking to mates
UK firms avoid outsourcing tech support

Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile

More from The Register

next story
Phones 4u slips into administration after EE cuts ties with Brit mobe retailer
More than 5,500 jobs could be axed if rescue mission fails
Driving with an Apple Watch could land you with a £100 FINE
Bad news for tech-addicted fanbois behind the wheel
Phones 4u website DIES as wounded mobe retailer struggles to stay above water
Founder blames 'ruthless network partners' for implosion
Radio hams can encrypt, in emergencies, says Ofcom
Consultation promises new spectrum and hints at relaxed licence conditions
Special pleading against mass surveillance won't help anyone
Protecting journalists alone won't protect their sources
Big Content Australia just blew a big hole in its credibility
AHEDA's research on average content prices did not expose methodology, so appears less than rigourous
Vodafone to buy 140 Phones 4u stores from stricken retailer
887 jobs 'preserved' in the process, says administrator PwC
prev story

Whitepapers

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.
Intelligent flash storage arrays
Tegile Intelligent Storage Arrays with IntelliFlash helps IT boost storage utilization and effciency while delivering unmatched storage savings and performance.
WIN a very cool portable ZX Spectrum
Win a one-off portable Spectrum built by legendary hardware hacker Ben Heck
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Beginner's guide to SSL certificates
De-mystify the technology involved and give you the information you need to make the best decision when considering your online security options.