Feeds

Intel puts Itanium saviour on ice

Takes the radical out of Tukwila

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

Intel has plumped, constrained and then killed a future version of Itanium once meant to save the entire franchise, The Register has learned.

The once elegant Tukwila processor with all of its eight glorious cores will now have just two or four cores, according to a source familiar with the processor's design. Intel has decided to equip Tukwila with a couple of fatter, more powerful processor cores instead of combining numerous lowered-powered parts. What was once Tanglewood - later renamed Tukwila - is dead.

El Reg was the first to discover Tukwila way back in March of 2003. The chip grew out of work done by ex-Alpha processor engineers from DEC and Compaq. It was meant to help Intel catch up with rivals IBM and Sun Microsystems by providing a multicore chip that could crank through software at a quick clip but not consume too much power.

Intel, however, has proven averse to taking risks with its Itanium line - or has simply been unable to deal with the beast. Itanium is the only high-end server chip that has yet to reach the dual-core stage. It will do that later this year when Montecito finally arrives. In the meantime, IBM and Sun are looking to pack four or more cores on their upcoming chips and then keep adding cores over time.

Should Intel come out with just a dual-core Tukwila part in 2007 - when the product is due - it will make Itanic an even bigger joke. Here's hoping management cuts the engineers a break and lets them show off a four core design. Without such a design, Intel will appear woefully behind its competitors, although it must be getting used to that position where Itanium is concerned.

The dual-processor and low voltage version of Tukwila - called Dimona - is still on tap for 2007 as well. It will receive the same tweaks as its higher-end papa. ®

Intel's official line is nothing has changed."There have been no changes to our roadmap," an Intel spokeswoman said. "We do not comment on rumours and speculation."

Related stories

The point of Itanium keeps floating with new chips
Who sank Itanic?
Intel and IDC at odds over Itanium's future
Multicore Itanic: Call me Tukwila
Intel's Otellini promises Year of Itanium
Analyst fires shot into Itanic's hull
Intel's Tanglewood pumped full of DEC Alpha goodness
Mister Tanglewood tapped as Intel Fellow
Tanglewood to run 10x faster than Madison
Intel Tanglewood's first voyage
Tanglewood: the next Itanium revealed

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
Ellison: Sparc M7 is Oracle's most important silicon EVER
'Acceleration engines' key to performance, security, Larry says
Linux? Bah! Red Hat has its eye on the CLOUD – and it wants to own it
CEO says it will be 'undisputed leader' in enterprise cloud tech
Oracle SHELLSHOCKER - data titan lists unpatchables
Database kingpin lists 32 products that can't be patched (yet) as GNU fixes second vuln
Ello? ello? ello?: Facebook challenger in DDoS KNOCKOUT
Gets back up again after half an hour though
Hey, what's a STORAGE company doing working on Internet-of-Cars?
Boo - it's not a terabyte car, it's just predictive maintenance and that
prev story

Whitepapers

A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Beginner's guide to SSL certificates
De-mystify the technology involved and give you the information you need to make the best decision when considering your online security options.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.