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Dell 'bait and switch' alleged

Californians sue

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Two Dell customers in California have sued the computer company in a class action suit. The plaintiffs allege that Dell didn't deliver the systems promised, and the suit also names CIT Bank, which handles credit agreements for Dell Financing, as well as Dell Financing itself.

One plaintiff alleges that a laptop advertised for $599 and an $89 printer, cost her over $1,300. Another claims that Dell supplied two PCs of an inferior specification to that ordered. One of the two law firms representing the plaintiffs said it has investigated over a hundred complaints since August.

The suit cites violation of two California state laws, the Consumer Legal Remedies Act and the Unruh Act. Law firms Lerach Coughlin Stoia Geller Rudman & Robbins in San Diego, and Jeffrey Keller in San Francisco will handle the litigation.

Dell declined to comment. ®

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