Feeds

Developers get an early night

Go on chaps you deserve it

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

Software developers are working far fewer hours than they were in 2001. Figures from the US Department of Labour showed the average working week for software developers has fallen from 40.1 hours in 2001 to 36.4 hours now.

Factors include: less belief in instant dot-com riches, a better work/life balance and older (and better) management teams compared to the dot-com madness years.

Many respondents said their firms had a "crunch time" - a period of much longer working hours in the run-up to big software releases. Almost 20 per cent said they had experienced "crunch times" which lasted longer than two months. Two thirds of those questioned said they worked between 65 and 80 hours a week during such periods.

The Department of Labour found the average working week in the US, across all professions, is 38.3 hours. Software engineers in areas like software publishing, telecoms and computer design, managed to cut half an hour off their working week. The average working week is now 41.5 hours, down from 42 hours last year. More info somewhere on the Dept of Labour site here.

Is this true? Have your hours got more sensible? Let us know in the usual way.®

Related stories

AOL axes Nullsoft - whither Winamp, Shoutcast?
Sasser author gets IT security job
Booze blamed for MS staff's 'foggy' blogging hoax

Remote control for virtualized desktops

More from The Register

next story
PEAK APPLE: iOS 8 is least popular Cupertino mobile OS in all of HUMAN HISTORY
'Nerd release' finally staggers past 50 per cent adoption
Microsoft to bake Skype into IE, without plugins
Redmond thinks the Object Real-Time Communications API for WebRTC is ready to roll
Microsoft promises Windows 10 will mean two-factor auth for all
Sneak peek at security features Redmond's baking into new OS
Mozilla: Spidermonkey ATE Apple's JavaScriptCore, THRASHED Google V8
Moz man claims the win on rivals' own benchmarks
Yes, Virginia, there IS a W3C HTML5 standard – as of now, that is
You asked for it! You begged for it! Then you gave up! And now it's HERE!
FTDI yanks chip-bricking driver from Windows Update, vows to fight on
Next driver to battle fake chips with 'non-invasive' methods
DEATH by PowerPoint: Microsoft warns of 0-day attack hidden in slides
Might put out patch in update, might chuck it out sooner
Ubuntu 14.10 tries pulling a Steve Ballmer on cloudy offerings
Oi, Windows, centOS and openSUSE – behave, we're all friends here
prev story

Whitepapers

Cloud and hybrid-cloud data protection for VMware
Learn how quick and easy it is to configure backups and perform restores for VMware environments.
Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Intelligent flash storage arrays
Tegile Intelligent Storage Arrays with IntelliFlash helps IT boost storage utilization and effciency while delivering unmatched storage savings and performance.
Website security in corporate America
Find out how you rank among other IT managers testing your website's vulnerabilities.