Feeds

Sanyo trumpets Wipoq debut

'Personal mobile gateway'

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

The essential guide to IT transformation

Sanyo's Dr Yukinori Matsumoto3GSM Sanyo has announced the first Wipoq; a messaging hand-held, not a phone. What is it? It's a "personal mobile gateway" peripheral device - but a breakthrough: it's one that doesn't actually need a PMG to work.

The news announcement conceals the breakthrough well. It says, blandly, that Sanyo has licensed an operating system for mobile devices; specifically, the IXI Mobile OS. The PMG is a development which everybody in Bluetooth said "that's obvious" three years ago.

IXI Mobile built one. It was a GSM phone that didn't have a keyboard or a speaker or a microphone or a display; just a bluetooth wireless. And then they designed "sleek" peripherals.

One would be a camera, one might be a message pad, one might be a headset and another might be a handset. There might even be a games console.

All those need a connection to the GSM network. None of them has a GSM wireless. So how do they work? Easy: all of them link to that network through the phone without keyboard; the Personal Mobile Gateway.

Few people have understood the idea, and there are genuine problems selling it. AT&T are keen on it: they've announced the Ogo message system. It's a PMG but sold purely as a box for SMS and email.

Sanyo has gone for something that at first looks similar. But the thing is just a bit cleverer; IXI Mobile has done away with the need for a PMG.

The Wipoq works best with a personal mobile gateway. But if one isn't available, it will work almost as well if it can find a mobile phone with the Lan Access Profile (LAP) built in. That's not the majority of the phones in the world; more like 30 per cent at most. Well - not to worry! -it'll work OK if you have any bluetooth phone with the standard SPP serial protocol profile... but it will lose some of the nicest features.

But it works.

The press release (here) refers to the "first Wipoq device" as simply: "A sleek multimedia messenger with a built-in Java browser, large screen, QWERTY keyboard, and easy to use interface."

Sanyo's Dr Yukinori Matsumoto (pictured above with a prototype) said that he expected first volume shipments in September, pricing somewhere between $200- $300 and available to real users by Xmas this year. But he has more plans, and there will be more Wi family devices next year.

© NewsWireless.Net

Related stories

Motorola bares its Bluetooth grin and points to the PMG
Hello Ogo : IM a-go-go
Buy our products, Sanyo tells employees

3GSM 2005

All the Reg stories from this year’s conference

The essential guide to IT transformation

More from The Register

next story
6 Obvious Reasons Why Facebook Will Ban This Article (Thank God)
Clampdown on clickbait ... and El Reg is OK with this
So, Apple won't sell cheap kit? Prepare the iOS garden wall WRECKING BALL
It can throw the low cost race if it looks to the cloud
Time Warner Cable customers SQUEAL as US network goes offline
A rude awakening: North Americans greeted with outage drama
Shoot-em-up: Sony Online Entertainment hit by 'large scale DDoS attack'
Games disrupted as firm struggles to control network
BT customers face broadband and landline price hikes
Poor punters won't be affected, telecoms giant claims
EE plonks 4G in UK Prime Minister's backyard
OK, his constituency. Brace yourself for EXTRA #selfies
prev story

Whitepapers

Top 10 endpoint backup mistakes
Avoid the ten endpoint backup mistakes to ensure that your critical corporate data is protected and end user productivity is improved.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Backing up distributed data
Eliminating the redundant use of bandwidth and storage capacity and application consolidation in the modern data center.
The essential guide to IT transformation
ServiceNow discusses three IT transformations that can help CIOs automate IT services to transform IT and the enterprise
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.