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Cisco overhauls security line-up

ATD tackles Trojans and spyware

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Security for virtualized datacentres

RSA 2005 Cisco aims to help its customers fortify networked systems against a broader range of attacks. The scheme - dubbed Adaptive Threat Defense (ATD) - is designed to contain a wider variety of threats using network devices such as firewalls, intrusion prevention systems (IPS) and routers.

Software upgrades across a range of Cisco products are designed to provide defence in depth against Trojans and spyware. The approach adds to Cisco's existing Network Admission Control (NAC) programme for curtailing the spread of worms (such as Slammer or Sasser) across corporate networks. "We're providing more sophisticated analysis versus siloed anti-virus defence," said Jayshree Ullal, SVP of the Cisco's security technology group.

ATD has three components: Anti-X defences (adding network anti-virus, anti-spyware, and URL filtering to security enforcement technologies such as firewalls and DDoS mitigation devices); improved application security controls and improved network control and containment capabilities. These improved network control allow security services to be virtualised making it easier, for example, to apply more granular controls on VoIP traffic.

Cisco announced the integration of its technology across various products in its security portfolio at this week's RSA Conference. It's available as either free software upgrades or as added blades to Cisco's router and DDoS mitigation appliances. Pricing and availability details can be found here. ®

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